Pin It

Welcome to Summer! (Almost): The approaching summer season brings with it a change in teams for one local athlete as well as heaps of events for your sporting pleasure 

There's plenty of competitions happening in the area to help kick the summer into gear.

click to enlarge trebonphoto.jpg
Bend’s Ryan Trebon is not only one of the fastest cyclocross racers in the world, he’s a darn nice guy. The 6-foot-5-inch 31-year-old finished last year ranked 15th on the world ‘cross standings and his tireless work ethic, large smile, and ability to generate otherworldly power on the bike has earned him the respect of both his fellow racers and his fans. But in his final years with longtime sponsor, Kona, Trebon says racing and training had become stale. And he will be the first to admit that his flagging enthusiasm showed in both his attitude and his results. His regular frustration on the race course earned him the nickname, Tre-Boo-Hoo. Needing a change, the lanky bike racer and his longtime mechanic, Dusty Labarr, struck out on their own seeking new sponsorship and improved results.
Without a title sponsor, last season proved to be tiresome and laborious, but Trebon says he learned and important lesson about entitlement: mainly that he was entitled to nothing. Realizing that you make your own happiness in this life has been just the medicine Trebon needed. His improved attitude and new sponsor,, should help the big guy achieve his best results to date.

Last week we sat down over coffee to discuss his new outlook, new team and how his fitness is coming along.

The Source Weekly: How will this season differ from last?

Ryan Trebon: I don’t have to do that much work. Less organizing and more ass-kicking!

tSW: In a recent interview your new teammate, Tim Johnson, he said that “Ryan is reborn.” What does that mean?

RT: Last year I was in kind of a funk. When you come pretty close to losing everything you see what it is that you’ve got. I’ve had a change in my outlook. I don’t think anyone is owed anything. I used to think that.

tSW: What's your biggest goal this 'cross season?

RT: A top 10 (at the 'cross World Championships in Louisville, Ky.) would be great, a top five would be fantastic.

tSW: Are you going to be fast this year?

RT: I’m already fast.

tSW: The ladies want to know: are you single and available?

RT: Yes. Single and available. But you gotta like hanging out with a tired, grumpy bike racer some days.

Female solidarity in disc golf

On Saturday, female disc golfers will converge on Hyzer Pines Disc Golf Course in Sisters to play two rounds of sanctioned disc golf at the Women's Global Event. The Professional Disc Golf Association event is open to both professionals and amateurs, and, in a move of women’s solidarity, it will occur concurrently with over 50 other events, staged across the globe.

“It’s the first of its kind through the PDGA,” said area tournament director Rachel Benton, a local pro. “It’s a way to get women involved.”

Organizing a global event is one way to do just that. Already there are 500 women signed up to compete on various courses across the globe. According to Benton and the PDGA, however, women make up only seven percent of the sport’s figures—a stat Benton and others are working to change.

Though Benton said there are only 20 women registered for the Sisters event, that number represents a relative improvement in local female participation, according to Benton.

To learn more about the Global Event, check out or

Mountain biking or dust!

Mother's Day (Sunday) marks the 15th Annual Cascade Chainbreaker Mountain Bike Race, a dusty and fast cross-country race staged on private land west of Shevlin Park. Though fast-rolling and largely non-technical, the course is a long one. Depending on your category, you'll race a minimum of 15 miles (one lap) and a maximum of 38 mile (three laps). For perspective, Trebon, also one of the nation's fastest mountain bikers, won last year's three-lap race in 2 hours, 40 minutes (though he'd like us to note that he did suffer a puncture). Alice Pennington, another on of the nation's best and Oregon's top female mountain biker, won in 2 hours, 3 minutes (two laps). So, you know, plan accordingly. Register at

Pole, Pedal Panic!

As evidenced from all the gapers in uncomfortable riding positions pedaling down Bachelor last weekend, we’re less than two weeks away from the biggest sporting event in Central Oregon—the Pole, Pedal, Paddle. With race day scheduled for May 19, the looming date has left many local athletes in a frenzy as they scramble to acquire the “right” gear and get in some specific, pre-race training.

If, however, you’re like us and are more interested in placing a bet on a potential winner, rather than actually racing, then you’re in luck. We’ve done a little poking and prodding to bring you a short list of race favorites.

On the men’s side, 2011 winner and cycling specialist Andrew Boone is again the man to beat, but he’ll face stiff competition from locals Zach Violett (multi-time runner up), Mike Condon (third last year), Jason Adams (fourth last year), Ollie Burruss (PPP rookie, elite skier), and wildcard Kris Freeman (U.S. Ski Team nordic skier, visiting from Andover, New Hampshire). On the women’s side, we doubt anyone will be able to challenge two-time winner Stephanie Howe. So put your money down on Howe again this year.

And before you call another bike shop inquiring after some ridiculous gear combination in order to “dominate the bike leg,” ask yourself, “when was the last time I spun out my current largest gear?” Enjoy yourselves, friends. This is supposed to be fun.


Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Latest in Features

Readers also liked…

© 2016 LAY IT OUT INC | 704 NW GEORGIA, BEND, OREGON 97703  |   Privacy Policy

Website powered by Foundation