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Friday, February 27, 2015

City of Bend Survey Seeks Input on Quality of Life, Spending Priorities

Posted By on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 11:29 AM

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Remember when we told you about the results of a recent DHM Research survey showing how Bendites feel about living and working in Bend? Well, the City is gearing up for the next iteration of that survey. 

If your perspective wasn't represented, head on over and share your thoughts about the general quality of life in Bend and how you think the City out to prioritize funding in the coming years.

Like any survey worth its salt, it's confidential and only takes about 10 minutes. 

Review the results of the most recent survey here.

And take the new survey here.

Feel free to share your thoughts about life in Bend in the comments.
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Winter Weather Advisory: Snow Expected Today

Posted By on Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 9:30 AM

It's been so long, we almost forget what a snowy Bend looks like. - ERIN ROOK
  • Erin Rook
  • It's been so long, we almost forget what a snowy Bend looks like.


Can it be? According to the National Weather Service, Central Oregon (especially the areas south and west of Bend) will see some snow today and tonight. About 2-4 inches is expected, starting at 4 pm. 

Read the official advisory:

...MODERATE TO HEAVY SNOW TODAY AND TONIGHT...

.A LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL TRACK ACROSS THE REGION TODAY THROUGH
TONIGHT BRINGING MODERATE TO HEAVY PRECIPITATION. HEAVY SNOW WILL
BE POSSIBLE IN THE HIGHER TERRAIN...ESPECIALLY ACROSS CENTRAL
OREGON.

CENTRAL OREGON-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...BEND...MADRAS...PRINEVILLE...REDMOND

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 4 PM THIS
AFTERNOON TO 4 AM PST SATURDAY...

A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 4 PM THIS
AFTERNOON TO 4 AM PST SATURDAY.

* SNOW ACCUMULATIONS: 2 TO 4 INCHES.

* ELEVATION: HEAVIEST SNOW ABOVE 3500 FEET...ESPECIALLY SOUTH
AND WEST OF BEND.

* TIMING: RAIN CAN BE EXPECTED TODAY. THE RAIN WILL CHANGE OVER TO
SNOW THIS EVENING. SNOW CAN BE THEN EXPECTED THROUGH SATURDAY
MORNING.

* LOCATIONS INCLUDE: BEND...MADRAS...PRINEVILLE...REDMOND

* IMPACTS: SNOW PACKED ROADS WILL MAKE TRAVEL DIFFICULT. THIS
INCLUDES ALONG HIGHWAYS 20 AND 97.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IS ISSUED WHEN SNOW IS OCCURRING OR IS
EXPECTED TO DEVELOP AND ACCUMULATE. TRAVEL MAY BE HAZARDOUS...
ESPECIALLY ON BRIDGES...OVERPASSES...AND SECONDARY ROADS.
MOTORISTS ARE URGED TO USE EXTREME CAUTION...AND SLOW DOWN TO
ADJUST FOR RAPIDLY CHANGING DRIVING CONDITIONS AND REDUCED
VISIBILITIES. FOR ADDITIONAL WEATHER INFORMATION...CHECK OUR WEB
SITE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/PENDLETON.

Stay safe out there and don't forget to shovel your sidewalk!
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Thursday, February 26, 2015

Film Event: Archaeology Channel Film Fest

Posted By on Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 12:15 PM

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The best archaeology-related films in the world are coming to Bend! Come to see some outstanding films and help us support TAC Festival 2015 by enjoying our mini-festival for four evenings (a different 2-hour show each evening). These are the top films from The Archaeology Channel International Film Festival that took place last May. All of them are award winners from this international competition.

Friday, Feb. 27, 7-10 pm and Saturday, Feb. 28, 7-10 pm. Central Oregon Community College, 2600 NW College Way. $7.

Wanna a sneak peak
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Tell Us How You Really Feel: Riding Bikes

Posted By on Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 12:12 PM

MATT FOX
  • Matt Fox
Bend has gained a bit of a reputation as a destination for bike-lovers. But biking is a broad category, including a wide range of recreational styles as well as commuting. Each type of cyclist has different habits, preferences and, dare we say, a different personalities. One thing we've noticed is that there seems to be less overlap between recreational cyclists and bike commuters than one would expect. To test that theory, we present our latest poll.

Tell us about your biking habits and elaborate in the comments.


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Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Open Casting Call for Bend Reality TV Show

Posted By on Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 4:03 PM


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Do you ever think to yourself, "I should've been a star"? Well, listen up, because this may (or may not) be your chance. An unnamed, L.A.-based "boutique production company" is apparently casting for a reality show based in Bend. The company, which claims to have credits with HGTV and GSN, describes the hypothetical show on its casting call website as being "in the tradition of scripted shows like Picket Fences, Twin Peaks, Northern Exposure and Portlandia." 

I'll admit, I'm a little skeptical. Not because Bend seems unworthy of reality stardom. On the contrary, we've had our fair share of reality stars and there's plenty of local flavor to flesh out a script with. But the elusive production company doesn't seem that familiar with Bend. (Or, you know, basic grammar and punctuation.) It describes Bend as "the epicenter of micro brewing of the mid-west" and the Cascade Mountains’ most fascinating city." (Note: I reached out to the casting company but haven't heard back yet.)

Still, if you're game, the company is looking for real people to portray the following:
From families who have been rooted to the city for generations, to the brand new resident who hasn’t even finished unpacking; the teacher who serves as the town’s armchair historian, the wisecracking bartender, the hotel clerk, the hero, the mechanic, the bakers daughter, the Doc, the town gossip, and everyone in between.
I mean, what's the harm in sending off a bunch of personal information to a stranger in the hopes you will be selected to audition "at certain times" in March and April at "various locations"?

So, what do you say, are you going for it?

Check out the full casting call here.
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This Week in The Source

Posted By on Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 3:00 PM

It has been a fun week at the Source, and it is a fun issue.
Our Outdoor Advisor, Corbin Gentzler, points readers to a series of ghost towns sprinkled around Central Oregon, reminders about a past that has come and gone, mining towns that time left behind.
But this issue is more about what from this legendary time still exists; in fact, it is about what is thriving—a young hat maker who is refashioning (quite literally) the cowboy icon, a couple from Arizona that brought the spiciness of Arizona to this high desert region with a line of salsas and our beer reviewer Kevin Gifford collects a six pack of beers that boast the wrangler and cowpunch swagger. Our annual Made in Central Oregon issue is both an archeological dig into the past and also a recognition about how much the “cowboy lifestyle” is still part of everyday life in 2015 in Central Oregon.
And, we present a number of articles that show off how that independent spirit that drove pioneers and cowboys is still here driving the cultural life in Bend—a Q&A with Diane Lane from Get-Lit who will present at next weekend’s MUSE conference; a look at the booming kombucha industry; and Delano Lavigne’s report from last Saturday’s Boulder Bash, the first-ever cash-prize climbing competition in Central Oregon.
No, this is certainly not Mr. Rodger’s neighborhood. It is community of daring and bold entrepreneurs that could ride tall with any cowboy. Giddy up!

NEXT WEEK: Debunking Bike Town USA


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Crossword Puzzle Answers (2/25/15)

Posted By on Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 9:00 AM

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Monday, February 23, 2015

5 Fusion heading James Beards' way again

Posted By on Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:22 PM

For the second year running, Executive Chef, Joe Kim from 5 Fusion and Sushi Bar has been named one of only 20 semifinalists for the James Beard Foundation Awards in the category of Best Chef in the Northwest. 

Congrats! 

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Exclusive Premier! New Music Video from AATS

Posted By on Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 7:24 AM

Minneapolis synth pop group Aaron & The Sea have a knack for making immersive, heart thumping music videos. In fact, it was the video for their breakout hit "Deja Vudu" that really set interest in their band on fire back in 2012.

AATS's often haunting visual representation is enhanced by the fact that they pair cold, spine tingling synth rock/pop with artful poetry. This isn't the kind of stuff you're going to be singing with your friends as you roll down the highway on a summer afternoon; rather, it's the type of music that worms its way into your psyche and your secret thoughts. That's especially true if you've seen the music videos that accompany their music.

Today, the Source is lucky enough to have an exclusive premier of AATS's latest music video for the song "Cloak & Dagger" which appears on the band's new EP out March 3 featuring remixes of that song.

The video, which uses facial masks as a canvas for depicting human frailty and the resulting personality facades we create, uses scenes that easily invoke the senses; like a frozen corn field and in indoor pool that conjures up the sent of chlorine. It's another visceral offering from Aaron & The Sea.

Check out that video below as well as the one that started it all after the jump. Just a word of caution on that second video though; don't watch it alone in the dark.

WORLD PREMIER- Aaron & The Sea, "Cloak & Dagger"

Continue reading »

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Friday, February 20, 2015

Fidelity Sells Skyline Forest to Singapore-Based Company, Future of Conservation Efforts Unknown

Posted By on Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 2:12 PM

Skyline Forest - JAY MATHER
  • Jay Mather
  • Skyline Forest
Skyline Forest, the 33,000 square-acre swath of forest land northwest of Skyliners Road, has a new owner. Singapore-based company Whitefish Cascade Forest Resources, LLC, purchased the forest as part of an acquisition of 197,000 square acres of forest lands in Deschutes and Klamath counties previously owned by Fidelity Financial’s Cascade Timberlands.

The sale is controversial because local conservation groups, as well as the Klamath Tribes, had been in talks with Fidelity over the past six years seeking a solution that would allow the Skyline Forest to be protected from development and to return Mazama Forest lands to the Klamath Tribe. 

“This is obviously a disappointment," Don Gentry, Chairman of the Klamath Tribes, said in a release. "Land recovery is an essential bargained-for benefit of the KBRA [Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement]. Nothing less than significant land recovery will work for the Klamath Tribes. We are committed to securing a land base that will provide balance in the Agreement and economic opportunity for our people. Without land recovery, the Agreement simply will not work for the Klamath Tribes.”

Closer to home, Deschutes Land Trust has been working to ensure the conservation of that land for the past decade. In 2009, the State passed legislation that provided a five-year window in which to negotiate a deal. That agreement also granted public access, a boon to the mountain bikers, horseback riders and hikers who blazed their own trails through the area. But that agreement expired last August, and Fidelity opted not to renew.

The hope had been that Fidelity would accept a deal that allowed for development on a small portion of the land in exchange for selling the remainder to Deschutes Land Trust. The Trust then intended to create a community forest, helping fund the sale by allowing a limited amount of logging, which would also help mitigate fire danger.

It's unclear what the sale means for the future of the forest, but Deschutes Land Trust Executive Director Brad Chalfant is cautiously optimistic.

"The short answer is we don’t know what it means for the future," he told the Source. "The fact of the matter is that all of the parties that had been trying to negotiate with Fidelity had stalled out over the past six months and this explains why. Fidelity was looking to sell all its properties as a package."

Fidelity explained its motivation for the sale—for which it received a total cash distribution of approximately $63 million at closing—in a press release.

"We are excited to monetize the value of Cascade for our shareholders," said Fidelity National Financial Chairman William P. Foley, II. "We have been owners of Cascade for approximately eight years and believe it is in the best interest of our shareholders to monetize the value of this land at this time and seek another use for this cash in the hopes of maximizing the value of our FNFV assets."

Chalfant said that while he has not yet made contact with the new owner, he is hopeful that they will be more cooperative than Fidelity. 

"We see this as an opportunity. Fidelity had been difficult to work with," Chalfant said. "We’re hopeful we’ll be able to have a more direct and coherent dialogue."

Whitefish Cascade Forest Resource, LLC, is registered with the State of Oregon in October 2014. An attorney for the company—its only listed U.S. contact—was not immediately available for comment.

While the Land Trust is still interested in pursuing the community forest model with the new company, Chalfant says he isn't married to that approach and is instead focused on the long game and whatever strategy leads to the forest's conservation.

"We’re not locked into a particular model. Ultimately our goal is to see the property conserved, available to public, and managed sustainably," Chalfant said. "We’re committed to the longterm. We’re going to do everything we can to ensure the property is conserved for future generations."

But where Chalfant sees silver linings, Central Oregon LandWatch Executive Director Paul Dewey has a less rosy outlook.

"We’re concerned that this is going to be a new serious threat for partitioning and development in that area, the kind we’ve been fighting for the past 10 years," Dewey told the Source. "My concern is it’s bad enough having a Florida developer own it, and now Singapore? There’s even less appreciation for what this land has historically meant for this area."

He added that development of the forest land is bad for Central Oregon because it disturbs wildlife—mule deer and elk migrate through the areas—and because the forest is at high risk for fires. Two wit, last summer's Two Bulls fire burned parts of the forest and, Dewey said, would have destroyed a home that LandWatch blocked from being built a few years back.

Though the area is zoned for forest use, that zoning allows one dwelling every 240 acres, meaning that the new owner could open it up to low-density development. Until he knows what Whitefish Cascade Forest Resource, LLC, intends to do with the land, Dewey said he'll be watching out for county land use applications. 

"Frankly, any development in that area, given climate change and what we know now about fire risk after Two Bulls, doesn’t make sense," Dewey said.

For more on this story, check out next week's issue of the Source, in print and online February 25.

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Index: Oregonians' Wellbeing is Solidly Mediocre

Posted By on Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 10:35 AM


GALLUP-HEALTHWAYS WELL-BEING INDEX
  • Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index
Despite the fact that everyone seems to want to move here, Oregon is not exactly the happiest state in the union. But it's not the most miserable, either. According to the 2014 Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, Oregon ranked 27th overall for well-being.

The index includes more than 2.1 million surveys and measures wellbeing across the following five categories: 

Purpose: Liking what you do each day and being motivated to achieve your goals
Social: Having supportive relationships and love in your life
Financial: Managing your economic life to reduce stress and
increase security
Community: Liking where you live, feeling safe and having pride in your community
Physical: Having good health and enough energy to get things done daily

Oregon did better in some than others. The state's highest ranking was in the community category, which is no surprise. The lowest ranking, at a dismal 41, was sense of purpose.

GALLUP-HEALTHWAYS WELL-BEING INDEX
  • Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index


The state with the highest wellbeing index was Alaska, followed by last-year's winner, Hawaii. A number of western states made the top ten, but Washington came in just behind Oregon at 28. At the bottom of the barrel—West Virginia. Here's how Oregon compares to other states.
GALLUP-HEALTHWAYS WELL-BEING INDEX
  • Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index


Why do these numbers matter?

"Researchers, policy makers and healthcare leaders need good information about the well-being of populations that they serve," says David B. Nash MD, MBA, Dean, Jefferson School of Population Health. "Well-being sheds light on the issues that drive quality, cost and productivity. A well-being metric also supports the creation of an action plan for our nation, in order to achieve sustained improvement in the health of our citizens.”

While the index doesn't hone in on Bend specifically, its Oregon report for 2012 and 2013 shows that the 2nd Congressional District (that'd be Rep. Greg Walden's territory) has the lowest wellbeing of all the districts in the state and is more or less in the middle of all districts across the country—219 out of 434 total.

GALLUP-HEALTHWAYS WELL-BEING INDEX
  • Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index

Are you surprised by the results?
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Wednesday, February 18, 2015

In This Week's Issue: Shaking Up the Status Quo

Posted By on Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 1:35 PM

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It is so easy to romanticize that winters were piled higher with snow when I was a kid, and that winter then was more, well, winter. Sadly, though, the data does back up these perceptions. The world is getting warmer—and, one of my favorite winter activities, skiing, seems to be becoming an endangered activity. For example, my two go-to ski areas—Meissner and Tea Cup Nordic Centers—have been closed for the bulk of the winter. 

Of course, I have long recognized the irony of my obsession with skiing: Although an outdoor activity, it is hardly eco-friendly. On average, patrons drive 60 miles for a day of skiing, and perpetuate a cycle of global warming.

With that mental framework, when I set out last week to research this week’s feature, I was expecting to find out even more bad news about the state of the ski industry. Instead, I was amazed at the far-reaching efforts that ski resorts at taking to become more sustainable and to drastically reduce carbon emissions and, hopefully, slow global warming. In particular, Mt. Bachelor is part of a vanguard of ski resorts that have taken pledges and real measures to reduce their carbon footprint.

It is encouraging to discover a group of people who aren’t happy with the status quo—and who are doing something about it. In that spirit, I also spent an evening last week previewing The Pillowman, a play hosted this weekend only by Cascades Theatrical Company and, more broadly, is part of an experiment they are hosting with a series of more edgy plays. Check out that review





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