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Thursday, March 30, 2017

Show Preview: Survivorman Live

Posted By on Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 11:20 AM

Throughout his storied career, Les Stroud has established himself as a multitalented Renaissance man. The Canadian survival expert starred in, filmed and scored every episode of the standout TV series "Survivorman," his style bringing unparalleled authenticity to the screen. When he wasn't hiking, fishing or educating his audience, Stroud was inseparable from his iconic harmonica. His musical talent quickly became a major part of his persona, and Stroud has since become a major stage artist.


DISCOVERY
  • Discovery

In his songs, Stroud takes inspiration from his adventures in the outdoors. With his latest track, Arctic Mistress, Les wrote his own lyrics and mixed in Inuit-inspired vocals. He has traveled everywhere form the Amazon to the Himalayas, so he has plenty of material for inspiration. To date, he has released four CDs. Stroud's career as a musician is just as impressive as his many feats of survival; he has performed alongside Lynyrd Skynyrd, Journey, and Slash. His own tunes range from art rock to folk, but all will please music lovers and fans of his show.

Les Stroud, the survivor, producer, cinematographer, author and musician, will come out of the woods to show off his musical prowess on April 8 at the Tower Theatre.

Les Stroud Live
Saturday, Apr 8, 7:30pm
Tower Theatre
$23-43
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Friday, May 1, 2015

Volcano Tour Part 2: Mt. Bailey and Mt. Thielsen

Posted By on Fri, May 1, 2015 at 2:12 PM

On Tuesday morning, the fourth full day of our trip, we headed up Crater Lake Highway, through a tunnel of trees glistening with fresh snow melting in the morning sun. It was a crisp, cold day and the snow was refreshing. We parked on the side of the road between Diamond Lake and the east ridge of Mount Bailey. Without a direct trail to the summit, we decided to bushwhack to the ridge and head straight up 3,000’ to the summit, carrying our skis on our backs until the snow was deep enough to skin. The sun was shining, lighting up Mt. Thielsen to the west and the dark blue waters of Diamond Lake below. Yet the air remained cold enough to keep the fresh snow in its powder form. By the time we reached the top of treeline, I was sinking to my knees as I broke trail. It made for hard work getting up the ridge, but our excitement for Bailey’s east bowls grew with each fluffy step. Storm clouds threatened and at times, the summit became socked in and diminished visibility, but each time, it cleared up again a few minutes later.

We reached the summit, and to our amazement, it wasn’t scoured or wind loaded. There were some enormous cornices across the bowl, but just below us looked good. We did some small tests for stability and quickly realized that not only were we in foot-deep powder, but the snow was totally stable, so we dropped into the bowl and skied the best powder of the year. I know with the lack of snow this year, everyone has said that it was the best powder every time it snowed this year, but seriously. This was legit!

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We paid for our powder turns with a long bushwhack back out to the road. The snow down low had melted, leaving partially hidden logs lurking below the snow and brush, waiting to take us down (and they did, more than once). We reached the road with a mix of exhaustion and relief, ready for a beer and a meal. The Pine Drops IPA I had stashed in the snow managed to stay cold even though most of the surrounding snow melted. Then snow flurries reappeared, so we packed up for a trip to Umpqua hot springs. We arrived late, after dark, and were shocked to find a total party scene and all of the springs occupied. We decided to come back at sunrise with our coffee instead. We crawled into our tent, set up next to the roaring Umpqua, which more than drowned out the noise of the partiers and made for an excellent night’s sleep. In the morning, we had the hot springs to ourselves and the hot water reinvigorated my tired muscles that had been cold for days on end. We hiked out and headed back up to Diamond Lake and the Mt. Thielsen trailhead, where we laid our gear in the sun to dry, made breakfast and got ready for our next volcano.

Mt. Thielsen is an easy hike (on a real trail!) that heads pretty much straight up its west ridge, where it intersects the PCT before emerging above the treeline. Its pointy, 9,183’ summit is an aesthetic icon visible from Crater Lake, Highway 97 and the mountains around Bend. We saw coyote tracks in the snow intersecting the trail and disappearing into the forest. We could also see our tracks in the Mt. Bailey bowl to the west. It was a sunny and warm day, the storms finally having seemed to move on. The snow was soft, but it became mushy as we ascended the slope above treeline, quickly lowering our expectations for the descent. But, it was a beautiful day and we had the mountain to ourselves, so we definitely were not complaining.

We reached the top of the ridge and looked over the steep drop off to the east. Crater Lake's glassy blue waters and Phantom Ship on its surface were just barely visible. From the ridge, the final climb to the base of Thielsen’s summit pinnacle looked really close and was tugging at me. We figured we had enough time to get up and down before dark if we didn’t hesitate too long. We couldn’t see the actual route up the summit pinnacle, so we couldn’t tell whether it was covered in ice or clear, but it couldn’t hurt to go up and check it out, so we dropped our skis and started booting up the slope.

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It was harder going than expected – the snow was deep and really soft, sticking to our boots and causing us to slide backwards. But, we made it to the base of the summit pinnacle, which, it turned out, was partially covered in snow. We still couldn’t make up our minds on whether to try climbing it or head back down to our skis. We were so close. We had been on a roll, bagging the last two peaks, and it was so tempting. Aaron started up the first couple climbing moves to see how it was. I started to follow and lost my confidence after a few moves. I had never climbed rock in my crampons and I wasn’t fully trusting my footing. Plus, it’s not a place where you can take a fall and expect to be okay, and we didn’t have a rope with us. And, even if we made it up, the thought of down climbing was troublesome. We have both been on the summit in summer conditions and decided that it didn’t make sense to take the risk. The descent back down to our skis was still tough in the mushy, slippery snow, and I was scolding myself for pushing it over the top. In the end though, it worked out.

Back at our skis in fading sunlight, we noticed that the snow had firmed up during our little side adventure up to the summit pinnacle. Awesome! We skied down on almost-corn snow for about a thousand feet before it got soft again. Even still, we were able to ski quite a ways down the trail to where we had stashed our shoes for the final hike out on dirt. As we made our way back to the trailhead, we saw the sun light up Thielsen with evening alpenglow before it finally sank behind Mt. Bailey.

Booting up Mt. Thielsen in mushy snow.
  • Booting up Mt. Thielsen in mushy snow.
We cooked burritos and camped at the trailhead for the night. The next day, we would be taking a rest day as we drove north to Mount Adams and Mount St. Helens. We also decided that since we didn’t get to ski Lassen Peak at the beginning of the trip, we would tack a day tour of Mt. Rainier onto the final day of our trip. 
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Friday, April 24, 2015

California and Southern Oregon: Blasting Wind and a Surprise Storm

Posted By on Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 10:55 AM

The Volcano Tour kicked off with a series of setbacks that altered our plans right off the bat. First, the California Cascades got up to two feet of snow several days before we left Bend, blocking access to the trailhead we needed for Lassen Peak. So, Mt. Shasta became our first objective. Our plan was to spend the first night camping at Helen Lake, at about 10,400’ and then head for the summit at 14,179’ the following morning. We arrived in Mt. Shasta City on Friday evening and stopped to pick up extra batteries and water. To our dismay, we discovered that The Goat Tavern, where we planned to enjoy a post-climb beer and burger, had gone out of business. We found a quirky pizza joint whose entertainment included ancient looking vending machines with temporary tattoos, questionably old gumballs and a “Love Meter” that we fed quarters to learn our sex appeal (my rating was sadly low). But the pizza was good and they had Deschutes Fresh Squeezed IPA on tap. With fully bellies, we headed up to the mountain and found a place to camp for the night.

On Saturday morning, we loaded up heavy packs and made our way up toward Helen Lake. It was slow going as we adjusted to the weight on our backs, but we got used to it and made good timing, reaching camp in just over three hours. The weather was sunny with storm clouds shifting through, dropping snow flurries, but it wasn’t too cold. The wind, however, was blustery and powerful gusts were increasing as we made camp and cooked soup, hot tea and hot cocoa. We watched snow getting launched over the ridge above us and occasionally making its way down to us. It felt like getting blasted in the face with sand, and with wind burned faces, we retreated into the tent and set an alarm for 3 am.

Those aren't clouds. That is snow getting blasted in every direction by the wind.
  • Those aren't clouds. That is snow getting blasted in every direction by the wind.
At 3 in the morning, the wind had not let up, and combined with the bitter cold, made for a restless night. Concerned about the risk of a wind slab avalanche on the exposed face we intended to climb, we decided not to attempt the summit on this trip. After 14 uncomfortable hours in the tent, we braved the wind, packed up and skied back down to milder conditions.

From there, we booked it back to Oregon and camped at the summit trailhead at Mt. McLoughlin. The weather was sunny and forecasted to continue improving through the week, so we were feeling optimistic and excited. On Sunday morning, we took our time drinking coffee before hitting the trail around 10:30 am. Compared to Mt. Shasta, we expected a mellow day, with about 4,000 feet of climbing to Mt. McLoughlin’s 9,495 foot summit. The hike was relatively mellow, although the wind reappeared during the final 1,000 feet to the summit, gusting strong enough at times to knock me sideways. The ascent was just steep and icy enough for the wind to stir up my fear, and as I kicked my crampons into the snow, I pleaded with the wind for a break. This time, it did give us a break and we successfully reached the summit, snapped some photos, and switched over to skis for a long ride down the northeast bowl and back to camp. The skiing was tough—a grabby, breakable crust—but the views were incredible. We could see the Crater Lake Rim, Mt. Bailey and Mt. Thielsen to the north, Mt. Shasta to the south, and Fourmile Lake and Klamath Lake down below.

Aaron skiing NE bowl of Mt. McLoughlin with Fourmile Lake below.
  • Aaron skiing NE bowl of Mt. McLoughlin with Fourmile Lake below.
Skiing the NE bowl of Mt. McLoughlin.
  • Skiing the NE bowl of Mt. McLoughlin.
Back at the trailhead, we opened celebratory beers (Deschutes Pine Drops IPA) and began cooking dinner. We noticed the temperature had dropped and clouds rolled in, but with the sun low in the sky and a sunny forecast for the week, we didn't think much of it. Then it began spitting rain and lightly hailing, but we laughed, thinking it was just a passing squall. By the time it was dumping snow, we were running back and forth from the picnic table to the car, throwing gear wherever it would fit. We devoured our dinner in the car and then headed out, intending to drive to Mt. Bailey via Medford and the Crater Lake Hwy. As we turned from the forest road to the highway, a full on white out had descended on us. Crawling through the snow at maximum speeds of 25 mph, I was still in denial, thinking that this storm would soon dissipate as quickly as it had appeared. But that didn’t happen. The snow stayed with us almost the entire way to Medford, and exhausted, we pulled onto the first quiet forest road we found and called it good for the night.

In the morning, we woke up to sunshine and blue skies, surrounded by forest of old growth blanketed in sparkly white snow. Feeling revived from the previous night’s ordeal, we made our way up Crater Lake Highway toward Diamond Lake, where  we would spend the next two days climbing and skiing Mt. Bailey and Mt. Thielsen. To be continued... 

Camp along Crater Lake Highway.
  • Camp along Crater Lake Highway.



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Monday, April 13, 2015

Deschutes Land Trust Acquires 58-acre Aspen Hollow Preserve

Posted By on Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 1:26 PM

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Deschutes Land Trust has purchased 58 acres of land along Whychus Creek as part of a campaign launched last fall to conserve habitats in the area, the group announced today. Dubbed the Aspen Hollow Preserve, the land near Sisters includes one half-mile of creek frontage and a variety of wildlife ranging from salmon and steelhead to mule deer and golden eagles.

“Our purchase of Aspen Hollow Preserve is a great example of how the Campaign for Whychus Creek can help conserve the best of Whychus Creek. Early donors to the Campaign provided bridge funding for the project while we worked with other funders to secure final purchase funds. The availability of this bridge funding allowed us to move quickly to secure the property when the opportunity presented itself. Going forward, we expect the Campaign will continue to be critical to conserving the remaining priority lands along Whychus Creek,” Executive Director Brad Chalfant said in a release.

JOHN WILLIAMS
  • John Williams
So far, Deschutes Land Trust has secured 2,200 acres of land around eight miles of Whychus Creek. We talked to Chalfant when the campaign launched last fall and he explained that the land trust's $15 million campaign should enable them to purchase back, if not all, of the land alongside the creek. About one-third of the total goal amount has been raised so far, with contributions from Land Trust members, the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the Laird Norton Family Foundation, and the Roundhouse Foundation.

For more on the Aspen Hollow Preserve, check out this week's issue of the Source, on stands and online Thursday.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014

Wolf OR7 is a Proud Poppa

Posted By on Thu, Jun 5, 2014 at 11:12 AM

OR7s adorable offspring.
  • Oregon Fish and Wildlife Office
  • OR7's adorable offspring.

This just in via Natural World columnist Jim Anderson:

According to word from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wolf OR7 not only has a girlfriend, but that term is past tense. He now has a "mate," and between them they have two healthy pups. If you would like a look them, go to the USF7WL/ODFW website.

You can read more about OR7's journey in the current issue.

After you've enjoyed looking at Poppa OR7's pups, go to the Wolftree Golden Eagle cam and watch the young Golden Eagle growing in a nest high above the sweet waters of Whychus Creek, in the Sisters Country. Look in. The last time I was there (Wednesday afternoon) the nestling was stuffing itself with some goody its parents brought in moments before.

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Friday, March 28, 2014

Natural World: Pygmy Owl Nesting Box

Posted By on Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 11:12 AM

As referenced in this week's Natural World, plans for a Northern Pygmy Owl nesting box.

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Monday, June 3, 2013

Rare Aurora Borealis in Oregon: Must See Photos

Posted By on Mon, Jun 3, 2013 at 11:26 AM

Aurora Borealis in Oregon? You bet your sweet colorful sky! The flickering lights, mostly caused by the sun's radiation, can sometimes be seen up to hundreds of miles from their origins at the poles, but rarely reach as far as our Oregon skies.
Regardless, May 31 was a night of amazing photography opportunities as the colorful lights stretched across the state and we slept right through it! Luckily, someone was paying attention. The video below was taken by Brad Goldpaint, an unassuming photographer at Crater Lake last Friday night, read his explanation below.

Continue reading »

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Monday, April 23, 2012

Why Tart Mattered

Fond remembrance of a closed restaurant

Posted By on Mon, Apr 23, 2012 at 6:14 AM


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Editor's Note: Joe Benevento is former head chef at Tart and writes the Source's Kitchen Chronicles.

I miss duck wings. There, I said it. I can't take it any longer, the truth must be told to the world. I miss me some lip-smacking good, confit duck wings. Truth be told, it had to be said for a lot of people. Since closing its doors over a month ago, Tart Bistro has left a longing in the hearts of many.

But, why all the sadness?

In this world of revolving door restaurants, how can it be a shock that yet another restaurant closed? Why does it even matter?

Because, simply put, Tart was different. Tart had some magic about it that did its thing on virtually anyone entering the door. We were captivated by its charm, by its je ne sais quoi.

Tart, which opened to little fanfare and attention, built its fan base the old-fashioned way, through being awesome and taking care of their people. A little place such as this surely operated from a budget, and could have gone the more tried-and-true route. Offer a predictable menu, cater to the cheap drink lovers of the world, and you will make money. That would have been the "safe" bet, and the one all too many restaurants have taken.

Tart didn't do this. Tart dared to offer what was delicious, even if it was different. Tart didn't comprise quality or vision for the sake of what's expected. The public is saturated with people who want to shop with their impulses and Tart didn't try to dumb it down, or cater to the crowd that wants everything "Americanized." Authenticity was paramount.

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Monday, February 20, 2012

Alpine Lake at Dawn

Posted By on Mon, Feb 20, 2012 at 6:01 PM


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Living in Central Oregon I am always reminded of my old stomping grounds in Switzerland. What Sparks Lake is to me here in Oregon, Seealpsee  was in my old country.

You have to walk up to this Lake which takes about 30 minutes. To catch the first light and the red glow on the rocks you the trail in the dark. This image was captured with a film camera and Fuji Velvia Film. That film had only 50 ISO and really had to be shot at 40 ISO so it got exposed right. Naturally a tripod was and still is essential for most landscape shots. The morning I took this image we had  one of those perfect late summer days in Switzerland when the air is fresh and calm and the sky has that deep stunning blue. Days we take for granted in Central Oregon  but in Switzerland and west of the Cascades are are hard to find.

I will be teaching a weekend workshop this spring on the top of the mountain you see in this photo. Mount Saentis has a Restaurant and a hotel on Top. The View taken from there is truly spectacular. I took the second photo one winter evening right after Mountains and it felt truly like the top of the world.
More of my photography: facebook

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