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Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Beware The Oregon Civil War Scams

Posted By on Wed, Nov 25, 2009 at 7:32 PM

How hot are Civil War tickets this year for the nationally televised Oregon – Oregon State game that will likely determine which of the two teams goes to the Rose Bowl? So in demand that the Attorney General wants you to be aware of ticket scams.

AG John Kroger issued a media alert this morning advising Beavs and Ducks to be on the look-out for bogus ticket deals, offering a list of tips for fans who want to protect themselves. In addition to buying from a reputable broker, Kroger says that fans should confirm that the seat, row and section listed on the ticket actually corresponds to a seat at Autzen Stadium.

And most importantly, like Internet celebrity sex videos, fans should be wary of any deal of any deal that sounds too good to be true.

 


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Thursday, November 19, 2009

Bachelor Pushes Start Time To Noon; Restricts Backcountry-style Hiking

Posted By on Thu, Nov 19, 2009 at 11:57 PM

We just got word that Mt. Bachelor has pushed tomorrow's opening day start time back about three hours from 9 a.m. to noon because of high winds. Bachelor's PR manager Alex Kaufman sent out a release this afternoon saying the mountain was predicting winds up to 70 mph overnight with winds tailing off to about 30 mph by mid-day.

"It's not a preferred type of day to open a season on, but we think this noon plan is our best bet to get started. We also have no interest in crowds of rabid skiers showing up early just to see "wind hold" (not fun for anyone). So noon is the plan Friday. We still plan to go at 9 a.m. Saturday," Kaufman said in the press release. 

Read the entire update and more on the mountains operating plan on Mt. B's Condition's Page

Skiers should note that Mt. B also highlights its new uphill policy in the update which goes into effect tonight. The policy prohibits skiers walking or skinning up the mountain in an effort to curb "backcountry" uses that Mt. B says can conflict with downhill skiers, grooming operations and the mountain's new avalanche equipment. One very notable exception is the "cinder cone" which remains open to hikers and skinners who crave its fresh, post-dump powder and steep slope. Access to the cone will permitted though a designated corridor on Leeway, according to Mt. B.

The question of whether un-ticketed skiers can roam around the mountain during ski season has been kicked around for years in Bend where diehards have maintained that the hill is open to all users since it is on public (FS) lands. However, based on Bachelor's safety concerns the Forest Service recently agreed to restrict uphill mobility. No word yet on what the fine will be or exactly how it will be enforced. Might we suggest some Blackwater security patrols. I hear they're looking for work and known not to take shit off dirt bag tele skiers.

 


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Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Oregon Lottery's Addict Problem

Posted By on Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 9:44 PM

 

The Oregon Lottery cleaned up its act, eliminating its NFL Sports Action pick ‘em ballot four years ago to appease the NCAA when the state was trying to land an NCAA men’s hoops regional tournament bracket, which it ultimately did. However, the Oregon Lottery, despite its problem gambling PSAs, continues to rake in a huge amount of revenue by exploiting gambling addicts, according a recent piece by The Oregonian.

Sarcastically dubbed a tax on, “people who can’t do math,” lottery games pull in a huge amount of sales – roughly $350 million, according to the Oregonian, from video slots where the odds are always stacked in favor of the house. The proceeds from the lottery help pay for books for school children and land for parks and other chronically under-funded programs in a state that has had its share of budget woes, including an impending fiscal meltdown. But a big chunk of that money comes from gambling addicts whose lives can spiral out of control as a result of the habit. The newspaper looked at three years of records and found that nearly half of the total revenue from video poker comes from 10 percent of players and that those players tend to lose big—to the tune of $500 per month—while fueling their habit.

While the Oregon Lottery likes to tout its contribution as no-cost benefit to the state and its taxpayers, the reality is that someone is picking up the check here. Meanwhile many Oregon corporations continue to skate by with $10 minimum corporate income tax, including 31 last year that had taxable income of more than $1 million, according to Oregon Center for Public Policy. It would be nice if the state could one day get its financial house in order so that Oregonians can have a honest discussion about the unseen costs of the lottery.


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Tuesday, November 10, 2009

The First Sign of the Apocalypse

Posted By on Tue, Nov 10, 2009 at 7:12 AM

Oh wait, Brett Favre in a Vikings uniform. Make it the second sign of end times.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/11/09/entertainment/main5592415.shtml

 


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Sunday, November 8, 2009

Bend UGB Decision Forthcoming

Posted By on Sun, Nov 8, 2009 at 1:13 AM

 

 

The city of Bend sent notice this week that the state is ready to give Bend a final word on its 25-year growth plan, which the city submitted to the state earlier this year after several long years of work by city staff, the planning commission and the council.

However, it looks as though the plan is likely to be kicked back to the city for a major re-work, according to one person with close knowledge of the formal process, who spoke to me off the record about the project.

The plan has long been the subject of controversy, a sort of proxy battle over the city’s history of pro-growth policies. And the council made no bones about its desire to include as much land as legally defensible in the new plan, which delineates how and where Bend can grow as the urban area expands into the surrounding rural areas of Deschutes County. However, it looks as though the city’s go-big strategy is going to result in a go-home result, as the Department of Land Conservation and Development sends the city back to the proverbial drawing board. Meanwhile, it’s anybody’s guess as to how long it will actually take Bend to exhaust the existing inventory of unsold and/or unfinished homes – not to mention all the unfinished and bankrupt housing development projects that dot the landscape.


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