The Beacon | The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon
The Source Weekly’s reporting is made possible by the power of your support. Be a part of it!
Search
Settings

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Goodbye Goomba's, Hello Bond Street Bar and Grill

Posted By on Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 1:09 AM

The restaurant casualties continue in downtown where longtime operator Peggy Falcaro announced on Monday that she has sold Giuseppe’s after a 20-plus-year run on Bond Street.

Longtime locals remember Giuseppe’s as one of the places to enjoy a good meal and a glass of wine before the boom. However, like many downtown establishments Giuseppe’s struggled to find its niche in the new downtown scene where customers have rewarded novelty, innovation, and, well, newness—none of which Giuseppe had in any great quantity. With this week’s closure, Giuseppe’s joins, Ernesto’s and Bella Cucina on the list of locally owned Italian eateries that haven’t survived the recession shake-out. Meantime, chains and franchises like Portland’s Pastini Pastaria, Carino’s and Olive Garden have moved in, creating additional competition.

Falcaro encouraged her friends and regular customers to stop in before Tuesday when Giuseppe’s staff will serve their last dinner. According to Falcaro, the new ownership will take over immediately and plan to open as the Bond Street Bar and Grill as soon as next week. It’s not yet clear what type of menu or format, that the new business will offer, however, the offerings will include, at least initially, a Giuseppe’s Classics sections on the menu that may help encourage longtime patrons to at least check out the new establishment.

While Falcaro was initially mum on the identity of the new owners, she mentioned that a pair of the restaurants’ popular front of house staff, Nancy and Hydie, will likely be on board for the launch of Bond Street Bar and Grill.

No word, either, on the fate of Giuseppe’s popular lounge, the somewhat underground, Goomba’s. Here’s hoping the new owners find a way to incorporate the well loved alley accessible lounge that’s faithfully watered this thirsty customer’s palate over the years. Salud, Giuseppes, and thanks for the memories.


  • Pin It
  • Email
  • Favorite

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Flaherty To Get Blaylock Murder Case

Posted By on Thu, Nov 18, 2010 at 1:30 AM

In a break from string of hostilities dating back to the May election campaign, District Attorney Mike Dugan has announced that his successor DA-elect Patrick Flaherty will serve as a special prosecutor on the high profile Lori Blaylock murder case. Blaylock's husband, Steven, was arrested last week and charged with killing his wife whose body has not yet been found.

Flaherty who takes office in January has been publicly battling with Dugan's office and county brass over issues related to his transition, particularly his authority to fire some of the deputy district attorneys and office staff when he takes control after the New Year.

However, given that Flaherty will likely have the reins through the bulk of the Blaylock prosecution, Dugan said in a press release that it would be appropriate to bring him into the case now as a special prosecutor.

"It is important to both of us that the work that is being carried out in this office for the benefit of our citizens be continued. Community safety is, and will remain, a primary goal of the district attorney's office," Dugan said in the prepared statement that alludes to the very public acrimony between Flaherty and the outgoing DA.


The release also indicated that the two met on Wednesday to discuss issues related to the office, which Dugan described as a "productive" discussion. That's a departure from some of the recent headlines, which have detailed how Flaherty has already butted heads with Dugan's staff, beginning with the August revelation that he intended to fire chief deputy Darryl Nakahira.

Deputy D.A.s responded by moving to unionize, which they did successfully in September. Since then the county has been working to develop the terms of the DDA's collective bargaining agreement. In the meantime, the county's legal staff wrote a formal letter to Oregon Attorney General John Kroger, essentially requesting that Kroger tell Flaherty to back off.

"If the county is named as a defendant in any lawsuit arising from Mr. Flaherty's actions, the county will tender such claims to the state. For these reasons, we respectfully request that you or someone from your office discuss Mr. Flaherty's plans with him either before he takes office, or at the very least, before he implements them," Deschutes County Attorney Mark Pilliod wrote in a two-and-a-half page letter to Kroger, dated October 26.

Those issues, notwithstanding Dugan and Flaherty announced Wednesday that they would spending next week with their transition teams to address issues related to changeover in the office, including case load management, the budget and "external issues."

Should be a fun pow-wow.

  • Pin It
  • Email
  • Favorite

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

After Abuses, City is Ready to Pull Plug on Parking Program

Posted By on Tue, Nov 16, 2010 at 11:48 PM

The city of Bend is preparing to pull the plug on its downtown parking validation program, again, because of persistent problems with downtown employees and business owners who abuse the system. City staff is proposing to kill the validation program at the end of the calendar year and has already met with the program’s chief proponent, the Downtown Bend Business Association (DBBA), to discuss the change. City staff and DBBA are already kicking around ideas to replace the validation program, but it’s not yet clear exactly what the successor program would look like. In the meantime, DBBA is generally supportive of ending the validation program at the end of the next month because of the problems that have been identified, said DBBA Executive Director Chuck Arnold. Of foremost concern is the sharp drop in parking revenue that the city has seen since reinstituting the validation program last year. It has lost about $37,000 in parking fine revenue since May of last year. The city and its parking contractor are spending a significant amount of time administering the validation program, which allows customers to have the $22 parking fine waived if they can prove that they were shopping at a downtown business. According to the city’s analysis, Diamond has spend about $35,000 in the past year and a half on enforcement and administration costs related to the program. As a result Diamond has reduced the amount of time that is spending on maintenance at the Centennial Parking Plaza.

While the parking validation program is seen as a downtown amenity, helping to level the playing field with other non-fee areas like the Old Mill District, the city has battled abuses for years by downtown merchants and employees. The problem isn’t getting any better under the current system. Since last year, the city has rejected more than 400 parking validation claims, mostly from employees and merchants who opt to hopscotch around downtown rather than purchase long-term parking permits. Of particular concern is the uptick in dubious validations. Between May and October the city saw a roughly 75 percent increase in rejected validations compared to the same period last year.

“What’s going on is not working,” Arnold said. “It’s creating more confusion than it is helping people.”


  • Pin It
  • Email
  • Favorite

Forest Service Wants Winter Leash Law Input

Posted By on Tue, Nov 16, 2010 at 1:29 AM

Forest Service Leash LawsBend dog owners who want more access to groomed ski trails will have a chance to share their perspective with the Forest Service and other winter trail users this week at an open house aimed at airing some of the access issues. While there are no official proposals on the table, off-leash proponents lead by Bend-based DogPAC have been pushing the Forest Service to ease restrictions north of the Cascade Lakes Highway in an area that has been off limit to dogs, unless by special permit, since the 1980s and is presently reserved for Nordic skiers.

While dogs are permitted off-leash in other areas of the Deschutes National Forest, including the trail systems around Wanoga and Edison Sno Parks, dog owners must share those trails with snowmobiles, creating the potential for conflict. DogPAC has argued that its members and other dog owners would be better suited to non-motorized trails.

They have proposed adding several new miles of groomed trail on the Nordeen plateau, which dog owners would access through trough the Swampy Lakes Sno Park. The Forest Service has not yet offered an official position on the working proposal. However, it's a sensitive issue with existing trail users because of the limited number of non-motorized trail miles in the winter trail networks closest to Bend. The Central Oregon Nordic Club, which currently maintains the Nordeen Loop as part of the un-groomed trail network, has already submitted a formal statement opposing the change. The Tumalo Langlauf Club, which maintains the groomed network under an agreement with the Forest Service, would be responsible for maintaining the Nordeen Loop should the Forest Service agree to the proposed change. The club, however, has not yet taken a formal position on DogPAC's initiative.

The open house could be the first step in resolving some of the issues, or solidifying the status quo. The Forest Service has said it is interested in hearing from all users at the open house and hopefully heading off some of the conflicts now, before the start of the winter season.

The open house is scheduled to begin 5 p.m. Thursday night at the Bend Metro Parks and Recreation building, 799 SW Columbia St.


  • Pin It
  • Email
  • Favorite

Saturday, November 13, 2010

Miller Landing Campaign Gets A Boost

Posted By on Sat, Nov 13, 2010 at 1:28 AM

 

The push to build a new riverfront park in Bend got a boost this week from the Oregon Community Foundation, which announced that it has pledged $50,000 toward the acquisition of the Miller Landing property. The news brings the Trust for Public Land, and the community at large, a step closer to realizing the vision of a new riverfront park just downstream of the Colorado spillway. If successful, the area would be developed as a public park and potentially a vital component of a proposed whitewater play area that could be constructed as part of a planned redesign of the Colorado Avenue dam.

The Trust for Public Land identified the Miller Landing property as one of its highest priority acquisitions during a recent survey of community open space assets. Since that time it has been working with property owners, which include the Miller Family (of Miller Lumber fame) and Brooks Resources to purchase the property. Bend Metro Parks and Rec District has already pledged $750,000 toward the acquisition. Both the Trust for Public Land and Oregon State Parks have committed $250,000 toward the roughly $1.7 million asking price. The pledge from OCF brings, Trust for Public Land within $185,000 of its goal, which it must raise before the end of the year according to the terms of the sale agreement with the Miller Family and Brooks Resources. TPL believes that it can reach that mark, but only with the help of local residents whom it is turning to down the fundraising stretch. To donate, go online to tpl.org. To contact the local office, call or email Kristin Kovalik at 382-2092, or email Kristin.Kovalik@tpl.org

 


  • Pin It
  • Email
  • Favorite

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Ramsay and Arnold Headed for Recount

Posted By on Thu, Nov 4, 2010 at 4:52 AM

It's late and my pain meds are just starting to kick in (sprained ankle) so I'll keep this short. But after speaking with newly re-elected Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship, I've got this to report about the too-close to call city Council race between Chuck Arnold and Scott Ramsay .

The un-official margin of victory for Ramsay is eight votes out of the more than 10,000 cast in the race. The election won't be certified for three weeks, however. In the meantime, the county needs to sort through roughly 300 contested ballots and about 300 provisional ballots -- an unknown number of which will be verified before the certification. The clerk's office has not separated those ballots to determine which ones apply to the Arnold-Ramsay race, maybe all of them--maybe none. Regardless, if the margin of victory for either candidate remains within about 40 votes there is a state-mandated hand recount. That count will likely begin around Nov. 30, around the same time the county begins a state required election audit, which will allow the county to use the same canvassing board for both tasks, according to Blankenship. Until then, we won't be sure just who will join the council in January. But if you happen to see either of the candidates in the meantime, congratulate him on surviving one of the toughest election seasons that I remember witnessing.


  • Pin It
  • Email
  • Favorite

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

A Quick Local Election Round-up

Posted By on Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 4:43 AM

(Update: Final numbers, or at least what appeared to be final this a.m. showed that voter turnout was much better than earlier  numbers indicated. Roughly 72 percent of registered voters turned out for the election in Deschutes County. However, late arriving ballots did little to change the overall results. Perhaps save the Bend City Council race which tightened to a razor thin margin overnight with Scott Ramsay, clinging to an 8, yes 8, vote lead over Chuck Arnold.)

The Deschutes County Clerk's office seemed particularly expedient this year, putting out election results in a matter of about an hour after polls closed. Perhaps that's a function of the dismal turnout, roughly 44 percent locally according the county clerk. The results were not good for anyone a D next to their name, meanwhile republicans and just about anyone who hung their hat on the Tea Party talking points fared quite well.

The big story of the night was the apparent defeat of Judy Stiegler, the junior state representative from Bend, who trailed Republican challenger Jason Conger by almost  more than 3,ooo votes with Conger grabbing an outright majority (52 percent) of the 31,000 votes cast. While some observers expected independent candidate Mike Kozak to siphon some votes from Conger, Kozak appeared to be a minimal factor in the race, grabbing just over 2,000 total votes,or less than six percent. A former city councilor and one-time Republican, Kozak ran on a platform of fiscal conservativism and limited government and by some accounts outperformed Conger in the debates. However, Kozak had limited resources for his campaign, which was limited to personal appearances, lawn signs and a few advertisements. By way of contrast, the Conger campaign raised a quarter million dollars for his run and spent it liberally, attacking Stieglers record on the economy in a series of dubious adds that portrayed Stiegler as a tax happy, liberal who trashed Oregon's economy. Stiegler made a late fundraising push and went after Conger's conservative credentials including his anti-abortion views and support of school vouchers. But  it appears to have been too little too late for Stiegler, who if nothing else was caught up in an overwhelming wave of anti-incumbency fever, here and everywhere.

The exception, locally was incumbent city council Mark Capell, who defeated conservative challenger Mark Moseley,  a former Freightliner executive, who campaigned on platform of fee and tax reductions (aka job growth) and limited government. With all precincts reporting, Capell led 54 to Moseley's 39 percent, just before 10 p.m. 

The more interesting story might be the other Bend city council seat where Downtown Bend Business Association ED Chuck Arnold squared off against local business owner Scott Ramsay. At 10 p.m. with all precincts reporting, Ramsay led by just over 300 votes out of more than 12,000 cast with more than 4,000 under votes reported. Could we be looking at a local recount?

In other Deschutes County news,

Republican Tony DeBone appeared to have easily defeated Dallas Brown in the race for the lone opening on the Deschutes County Commission. The 25-year-old Brown ran a spirited campaign, however. And don't be surprised to see his name pop up again in upcoming elections.

Statewide, the governor's race remained too close to call, with Dudley hanging onto a slim lead but several thousand votes remain to be counted in Multnomah County. Dudley fared much better in Deschutes County where he nabbed almost 60 percent of the vote. Results of State Senator  Chris Telfler's bid for treasurer, however, were more clear. Telfer trailed incumbent Ted Wheeler by a wide margin and the race was called early for Wheeler.

In statewide Measure's news, Oregonian's appeared to overwhelmingly support the latest get-tough on crime measure from Kevin Mannix and the Oregon Ant-crime Alliance that would require mandatory minimums for some sex crimes and repeat DUI offenders. However, they rejected a proposal to create a statewide dispensary system for medical marijuana patients. California votes rejected a more sweeping measure that would legalized possession of up to an ounce in that state.

Complete local results:

http://www.deschutes.org/electionresults/


  • Pin It
  • Email
  • Favorite

Newsletter Signup

Get Central Oregon daily news
directly in your inbox

Newsletter Signup

Get Central Oregon daily news
directly in your inbox

© 2021 LAY IT OUT INC | 704 NW GEORGIA AVE, BEND, OREGON 97703  |   Privacy Policy

Website powered by Foundation