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Why Single Pay Works When Senator Jeff Merkley ended his town meeting at Summit High School, I was standing with the microphone man waiting to be the next speaker. September 09, 2009
Letter of the Week: What Are You Afraid Of? It's campaign season, and that's evident based on the assault of television and radio political ads that are dropping as the nation girds for this October 08, 2008

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  • Little Bites: Hideaway Gives a Shot to Southeast Bend

    After several months of interior makeover work, the neighborhood bar and restaurant reopened this past week as the Hideaway Tavern.
      I recently moved out of northeast Bend, a virtual wasteland when it comes to food and nightlife. (The last vestige of culinary civilization, Little Pizza Paradise, picked up stakes and moved to Cascade Village Mall earlier this summer.) I didn’t improve my lot much by moving to southeast Bend, particularly when it comes to nightlife. A few scattered pubs on Third Street and an outpost at Reed Market were an improvement, but hardly a sea change. To make matters worse, my favorite South side watering hole/pizza place and blues club, Grover’s, recently closed.
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  • Tinseltown or Bike Town?

    A few celebrities that have made their way through the area.
      Rainn Wilson Claim to Fame: Had his stapler ensconced in Jell-0 by John Krasinski, aka Jim Halpert. Last Known Location: Universal’s sound studio Wilson, i.e. Dwight Schrute from NBC’s The Office, showed up in Sisters a few years back. A Northwest native who grew up in Seattle, Wilson keeps a relatively low-profile, but has made at least one cameo appearance on the Les Schwab stage in Bend. He walked out onstage with Portland’s The Decemberists and feigned as if to lead the band’s opening song. A few years earlier, Wilson riffed hilariously on Late Night with Letterman about a snake encounter at his Sisters-area home.  
  • End of the Line at ALEC?: Controversial corporate bill mill faces challenge from public interest group

    A conservative corporate-backed organization that connects lawmakers with industry insiders to craft ready made laws could lose its non-profit status that allows it to wine and dine lawmakers like Central Oregon’s Gene Whisnant.
      A conservative corporate-backed organization that connects lawmakers with industry insiders to craft ready made laws could lose its non-profit status that allows it to wine and dine lawmakers like Central Oregon’s Gene Whisnant. The American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, faces a challenge from the Washington D.C-based citizen advocacy group Common Cause, which alleges that ALEC is nothing more than a pipeline from corporate boardrooms to capitol steps.

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