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  • Issue of
  • Jan 24-30, 2008
  • Vol. 12, No. 4

News

  • Local News
  • City Beat: Burning and Dams

    Still Burnin'? Just two months ago, it looked like the Bend City Council was moving full speed ahead to ban all open burning within city limits in an effort to clean up the city's air, but now it appears that a complete ban on burning yard waste and other debris isn't in the cards. At last week's meeting, the council discussed an ordinance that would ban open burning, except during two days in November - a divergence from earlier indications that the city might ban all forms of burning. By the end of the discussion, however, the council decided by way of a four-to-three vote to amend the proposed ordinance to allow burning during the two-day November period, but only on parcels of land two acres or larger with a Fire Department-issued permit. The council has not approved the ordinance, but will revisit the item at future meetings.

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • Paid Kindergarten

    Imagine a public school system in which parents have to pay extra if they want their kids to have up-to-date textbooks instead of 20-year-old ones.
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Culture

  • Video
  • Overrated: Films that the MPAA doesn't want you to see

    In September of 2007, Ang Lee (director of Brokeback Mountain, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and many more) was saddled with the NC-17 rating by the Motion Picture Association of America's censors on his movie, Lust, Caution. The rating is the kiss of death at the box-office. No matter what reviewers say, the large ticket-buying population of under-17-year-old viewers have already been axed out of seeing the film, much less those that equate the NC-17 rating with porn. Most of the time, there is usually one scene that censors just can't stomach, so to save their films from bombing at the box office, directors will go back and cut the scene enough to appease the thumb-screwing censorship committee, which later gets reinserted and released on DVD as the "director's cut." Below are some "directors cut" versions of some originally NC-17 or X-rated films.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • Soothing Beverage Choices: Sipping it up at Townshend's Tea

    A spot of milk with your tea at Townshend's, Bend's new downtown teahouse.As the menu at Townshend's Tea Company states, tea has been relegated second-class status in the States. Ever since rogue colonists tossed their British rulers' supply overboard into Boston harbor, tea has taken a back seat to the more pungent, and stimulating, coffee bean. The new downtown teashop, Townshend's, embraces that underdog reputation, offering an unabashed sanctuary for tea leaves and tea lovers. The location that housed Pfundementals for as many years as I can remember has been cleaned up, buffed out and infused with a tea-worthy atmosphere. Retro, antique and modern furniture blend with the polished concrete floors, pillowed benches and brick walls to lend a tranquil, but energetic, climate that is imbued with alternative atmospheric music. The menu is extensive and slightly intimidating for the tea neophyte. To alleviate some of the possible stress of deciding from more than 100 teas and infusions, owner Matt Thomas has divided the selections into types of teas such as white, rooibos and oolong; rare and top-grade teas like matcha, bao zhong and pu-erh wang; as well as separating out the infusions which are listed under "Apothecary".
  • Chow
  • Soothing Beverage Choices: Sipping it up at Townshend's Tea

    A spot of milk with your tea at Townshend's, Bend's new downtown teahouse.As the menu at Townshend's Tea Company states, tea has been relegated second-class status in the States. Ever since rogue colonists tossed their British rulers' supply overboard into Boston harbor, tea has taken a back seat to the more pungent, and stimulating, coffee bean. The new downtown teashop, Townshend's, embraces that underdog reputation, offering an unabashed sanctuary for tea leaves and tea lovers. The location that housed Pfundementals for as many years as I can remember has been cleaned up, buffed out and infused with a tea-worthy atmosphere. Retro, antique and modern furniture blend with the polished concrete floors, pillowed benches and brick walls to lend a tranquil, but energetic, climate that is imbued with alternative atmospheric music. The menu is extensive and slightly intimidating for the tea neophyte. To alleviate some of the possible stress of deciding from more than 100 teas and infusions, owner Matt Thomas has divided the selections into types of teas such as white, rooibos and oolong; rare and top-grade teas like matcha, bao zhong and pu-erh wang; as well as separating out the infusions which are listed under "Apothecary".

Screen

  • Film
  • The Late Ones: Two siblings care for the father who never did

    Nothing like a good ol' fashioned awkward moment...The Savages, the title of which refers to the characters' names as well as their predicament, is not, as luck would have it, another bleak film about people behaving badly. It can't avoid being a grim picture in places, what with its subject matter - the death of a parent by dementia - likely to provoke nearly universal feelings of dread. But writer/director Tamara Jenkins (Slums of Beverly Hills) presents The Savages as a tale of survival, one in which Wendy (Laura Linney) and her brother Jon (Philip Seymour Hoffman) reshuffle their lives when the father who abandoned them can no longer care for himself. It's a savage undertaking, to be sure, but Jenkins isn't interested in death as much as how death reorganizes the lives it doesn't take.
  • Film
  • A Case of the Shakes: Cloverfield offers a refreshingly fresh take on monster genre

    Just one of the dizzying moments in Cloverfield.After many months of prerelease hype and viral marketing, audiences are finally getting a look at Cloverfield - a scary, very shaky (physically, not technically) disaster movie whose effect is often distressingly real. So real, that some folks I saw it with seemed ready to vomit. The premise is that a tape has been found in Central Park after an unexplained disaster, and our task is to sit back and watch it. It begins with playful couple Rob and Lily (Michael Stahl-David and Jessica Lucas) as they speak to one another after a night of apparent unabashed sexuality.
  • Film Events
  • Something for the Masses: BioWare's new offering pushes the RPG envelope with "Mass Effect"

    Bio-Ware returns to the role-playing format with the excellent "Mass Effect." When BioWare made "Star Wars: Knights of the Republic" and "Jade" for the original Xbox system, they made a lot of gamers happy. They put some time and effort into it, and the result was great RPG storytelling that made Microsoft a major "player" in the console wars. Now BioWare is taking its turn on the Xbox 360 with "Mass Effect." The game publisher is so confident about the game that it plans a trilogy. In the meantime, it's providing downloads to bridge the gap between game releases. As with BioWare's other RPG titles, you have the option of playing as a man or woman. The decision influences your interaction with other characters and enables you to customize the character's appearance. You also have limited control of two other characters that will help you along.
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Sad vs. Happy: Local songwriters explore the dark and light sides of the musical force

    Laurel Brauns Closed for the Season ★★★1/2 out of 5 stars It's remarkably appropriate that the cover of Bend-based singer-songwriter Laurel Brauns' latest album is black and white (mostly black). The cover photo is a moody, monochromatic shot of a wet-haired, shirtless young boy standing outdoors. He looks cold, and he's holding an earthworm awkwardly in the palms of his hands. You can't tell if it's dead or alive - only that the boy seems to harbor a solemn fascination for it. The songs on Closed for the Season echo the mystery and the melancholy of the photo...mostly the latter. In fact, Brauns' words and music push a would-be "folksy" sound deep into a strange, enthralling realm of Old-Worldly organic gothic.
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  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Sacred Steel: The guitar gospel, according to the Campbell Brothers

    Keeping the steel in the family.In a weird way, it's accurate to call the Campbell Brothers "church music," because, technically they play their tunes in a church, just as they've been doing since they were kids. But this isn't the church music of organs, autoharps and white-haired women singing falsetto with one hand raised, leading a drowsy congregation though a down-tempo hymn - this is pretty much rock music. Chuck Campbell grew up in the House of God Church, a Pentecostal, predominately African-American denomination that shies away from the pipe organ, opting for the steel guitar to lift the spirits of the congregation, and get them moving their feet. This isn't a whining, yawning county Western slide guitar - the House of God sound, often referred to as "Sacred Steel," is more of a shouting, screaming, wailing manipulation of the instrument that, when accompanied by a band, is pretty hard not to dance to.
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Welcome to Reggaetown, Oregon: Three reggae shows in two days - seriously?

    Soldiers of Jah Army, honorary mayors of Reggaetown.We've pounded it into these pages more than enough in the past six months, and a sincere apology to all if this seems like a message from the Department of Redundancy Department, but ... what is up with all the friggin' reggae going down in this town? At this point, I'm not even sure how I feel about it, but I sure as hell can't avoid it. And maybe we shouldn't even worry - the Benders (we're taking a week off from mentioning "Bendites" in the paper) seem to love it. This weekend could very well be the peak of the local reggae movement with three separate reggae shows in a matter of 48 hours. Here's a rundown of what you can (if you so choose) sway, bob and swing your dreads to:

Outside

  • Outside Features
  • A Super Letdown: Green Bay folds in OT, Lynchgate lurches on and more!

    Why can't this Pac Man get eaten by a ghost?18 AND ARIZONA How good is New England? Well, Tom Brady throws three interceptions, Randy Moss is barely a mention in the game and yet the Patriots efficiently dismantle the San Diego Chargers, 21-12 in the AFC championship game. Kevin Faulk catches eight passes, Laurence Maroney rushes for 122 yards, including critical first downs on the clock-chewing final drive in the fourth quarter. Jabar Gaffney catches a touchdown pass, Wes Welker catches a touchdown pass. The ageless Junior Seau makes key defensive plays. Rodney Harrison pressures Philip Rivers. And, the offensive line continues to stake a case as the best in the NFL, whether run or pass blocking. Yeah, New England is that good. ELI'S COMING How improbable is winning three games on the road, including defeating not only the frequently sleeveless Green Bay Packers, but the ghosts of the legends oozing from the frozen tundra (minus one degree, the third coldest game in NFL post-season history) of Lambeau Field? Well, the New York football Giants (love the sound of that!) accomplished one of the most difficult feats in sports to reach their fourth Super Bowl and create the second consecutive championship game that features a Manning at quarterback.  
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  • Outside Features
  • Fairy Meadows: The ultimate in backcountry skiing adventure

    Living the high life at Pioneer Peack in B.C.If I could look into a crystal ball filled with a snowman and snow flurries abounding after a good shake and dream up the perfect backcountry skiing adventure, it would contain the following: fly into a backcountry hut with several psyched powder lovers, ski all day - every day - for a week in untracked terrain among jagged peaks and glaciers, then head back to the hut for lots of good cheer and gourmet cuisine while basking in the glow and tales of the day's adventures. This fairy tale came true the first week of the New Year as my wife Molly and I drove north to Golden, B.C., After meeting up with the enthusiastic group in Golden, 20 of us gathered our gear and food at the helicopter loading site. It was a clear day with great visibility, perfect for a heli ride. I was fortunate enough to ride shotgun on the first of five trips our group took to get all our bodies and supplies into the hut. We flew along the Columbia Arm of Kinbasket Lake, the headwaters of the Columbia River, before swinging west into the Adamant Range of the Selkirk Mountains. My eyes bulged as the views became better with every minute. The heli set us softly down just below the Bill Putnam (Fairy Meadow) hut in a hanging valley surrounded by picturesque B.C. mountains.

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