The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon | Issue Archives | Dec 11, 2008
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  • Issue of
  • Dec 11-17, 2008
  • Vol. 12, No. 50

News

  • Local News
  • Empty Houses: When it becomes your turn to feel the downturn

    My children recently enjoyed an unseasonably warm December afternoon by running and playing games in the backyard of our northwest Redmond home. As their screams and laughter grew louder, I stuck my head out the sliding glass door to say, "Quiet down. You'll bother the neighbors." But then I remembered. The two houses that border our backyard now stand empty. There is no one to ask to throw a stray ball back over the fence. No sounds of yard work or family life to break up the afternoon monotony. As much as I enjoy tranquility, this silence around us is both strange and sad. Once noisy and alive with the sounds of kids at play and lawn mowers at work, my neighborhood is starting to feel more like a ghost town. There's something a little haunting about being surrounded by vacant 2,300-square foot homes. You look up at the windows and almost expect to see shadows. Each empty house serves as a reminder of a battle lost or a dream shattered.

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • Snow or No Snow: Bachelor ready to party, a UGB deadlock and more

    Opening Day - Finally? Most of Upfront's friends have given up their snowdance routines out of frustration and re-focused their energies on other more productive activities like tree trimming, recreational drinking and couch surfing, but we have word from reliable sources that snow is in fact on the way - finally. While the powers that be at Mt. Bachelor say they still don't know if they will be able to open this weekend, they're planning to hold a "Snow or No Snow" party from noon to 4pm Saturday at the mountain with all pass holders receiving a free beverage and a chance to hit the tubing or rail jam parks - snow permitting. It's been a frustrating non-start to the season for the mountain's staff and legions of seasonal employees who are still waiting to start work.
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  • Editorial
  • Kulongoski's Onerous, Odious Fee Increase

    There's something for nearly every Oregonian to not like about Gov. Ted Kulongoski's proposed budget for the next biennium. Faced with sagging tax revenues, Kulongoski wants to raise state fees on a whole passel of people and activities. Hunting licenses and fishing licenses will cost a lot more. Nurses and psychologists will pay more for their professional registration. Campers who stay in state parks will see their nightly fees nearly double. The cost of a death certificate will almost triple. Even falconers will see the cost of their licenses (yes, you need a license to hunt with a bird in Oregon) jump by 125%. The most onerous and odious of the increases Kulongoski is proposing, though, is raising the fee to register a motor vehicle. It's now $54 for two years; Kulongoski wants to triple it to $162.
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Culture

  • Culture Features
  • A Ghost in the Paint: Alex Reisfar's late night creations

    Where the magic happens.You may be surprised when you walk into Hot Box Betty expecting pretty things and are confronted by Jaws and Dead Birds. Not that the paintings by Alex Reisfar aren't beautiful - they are. Reisfar's work has a Latin American influence; the figures are rendered like those of Diego Rivera or Antonio Ruiz. In Maria and Child, the breastfeeding mother's hair transforms into artery and umbilical cord ala Frida Kahlo, while her masked face draws from the indigenous revolution. "In parts of the Zapatista movement, they have these pamphlets, and the imagery in them, especially the female Zapatistas, is very powerful," Reisfar says. While initially surrealist, Reisfar's paintings are not about dream worlds, but full of intentionally applied symbols. The drama in the work is not happenstance from the subconscious, but grounded, as he says, in "anarchist history and theory." One piece is blatantly anti-war; a soldier with a leering skull greets a smiling baby and a female figure that cannot face him or the viewer. In El Cazadore, a great white shark signifies a menacing force ("great white: GW," Reisfar points out) while a Zapatista child stands in defiance. In Gaurdian, a Native American child begins to unravel. Reisfar is confronting big subject matter: death, organized religion, war, propaganda and white guilt.
  • Picks
  • Our Picks for the Week of 12/10-12/18

    Slick Side Down CD Release Party thursday 11 Bend's smooth jazz/funk/R&B band is releasing their debut CD Eat At Joe's and they want you to celebrate with them. The self-proclaimed "Loudest Band in Bend" (we may have heard a few louder ones, but whatever) will have you dancing in no time to the quartet's funky distinctive jazz fusion sounds. No cover. 6:30pm. The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 NW Greenwood Ave, 318-0588. The Summit Saloon & Stage First Anniversary Party thursday 11 Believe it or not, the Summit has been open for an entire calendar year and the popular nightspot is celebrating with what's sure to be a ripping set from Moon Mountain Ramblers and then dancing late into the night with DJ Moksha. The Summit has been through a bevy of entertainment changes over the course of the year, going from a live music venue to a dance hall and back again, but things are looking up over there on Oregon Avenue. No cover. Summit Saloon and Stage, 125 NW Oregon Ave.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • South by Northwest: Zydeco remains a predictably unpredictable gem

    Flavor piled high at Zydeco.Like so many of the best things in life, Zydeco isn't exactly as it seems. You wouldn't guess that behind a modest façade tucked away among car dealerships on Business 97 you'd find a country-Zen dining room awash in sage tones and minimalist art or the subtly swanky lacquered terra cotta bar dotted with colorful specialty cocktails sitting beneath hanging droplet lights. And the food, too, is unexpected: high-flown in execution yet completely down to earth in concept and attitude. And rather than offering Cajun cuisine, as the name suggests (it's actually a tribute to a family dog), the menu is American with a pan-southern emphasis. All around, Zydeco is a series of happy paradoxes, combining northwestern refinement with robust southern flavors, urban sophistication with southern hospitality, and upscale fare served up in impressively southern portions.
  • Chow
  • South by Northwest: Zydeco remains a predictably unpredictable gem

    Flavor piled high at Zydeco.Like so many of the best things in life, Zydeco isn't exactly as it seems. You wouldn't guess that behind a modest façade tucked away among car dealerships on Business 97 you'd find a country-Zen dining room awash in sage tones and minimalist art or the subtly swanky lacquered terra cotta bar dotted with colorful specialty cocktails sitting beneath hanging droplet lights. And the food, too, is unexpected: high-flown in execution yet completely down to earth in concept and attitude. And rather than offering Cajun cuisine, as the name suggests (it's actually a tribute to a family dog), the menu is American with a pan-southern emphasis. All around, Zydeco is a series of happy paradoxes, combining northwestern refinement with robust southern flavors, urban sophistication with southern hospitality, and upscale fare served up in impressively southern portions.

Screen

  • Film
  • Nothing Noble: Techno music, camera quirks and contrived plot twists sink Nobel Son

    Hey baby, take a look at this Nobel Prize I've got here.Like a root canal, the best thing you can say about the new Alan Rickman movie, Nobel Son, is try to endure the first 30 minutes, it does get better, but only slightly. But like that popular dental procedure, it also lingers for the rest of your day causing you intense moments of nausea and disquietude. The same gang that gave us that clumsy but charming wine movie, Bottle Shock, got together lock, stock, and (ouch!) barrel and decided to make what the PR folks call a psychological thriller. You and I, however, might call this new genre cinema terrible. At least Bottle Shock had at its core a reasonable (and largely true) story held thinly together by two good actors who appear in Nobel Son as well. But the supporting cast included actors so far over their heads and drowning you left the theater gasping for air.
  • Film
  • The Wrong Neighborhood: Tragic tale of innocence in a death camp

    They had tire swings in those days?Let's cut to the chase here: The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is hardly uplifting. Based on the book by John Boyne, this movie tells the haunting story of the atrocities of the Holocaust as seen through the eyes of a child. Opening with a quote that a child experiences sight and sounds before reasoning takes over, the movie begins with symbolic scenes of kids harmlessly playing war, setting up the innocence that is to be shattered.

Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • CD Review - Woven Hand

    Woven Hand Ten Stones Sounds Familyre Music dealing with spirituality, especially themes Christian in ethos, struggle to set a high standard for artistic achievement. David Eugene Edwards' current project, Woven Hand, is unlike most that attempt to sing about the Divine. The message on Ten Stones (which was released this past September) is generally the same as with any recording by Edwards and company; Old Testament imagery coupled with the ugliness of sin and beauty of redemption. However, Ten Stones is much heavier sounding than previous albums. Ten Stones is hypnotic, forceful, and inevitably haunting. The musicianship, as it is with any Woven Hand album (also see 16 Horsepower), is incredible. The layering is rich and each song dwells beside the next naturally while heavy bass, raw guitars and pushing drums aggressively and fiercely weave an explosively majestic album. Edwards' deep, untamed voice allows his words to find their appropriate place. When he sings: "All these tears/Gather together/Down your cheek/ Your neck and feathers" on "Iron Feather," it's a simple reminder that few sound quite like this.
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  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • The Youth Movement: Finding an above-ground basement show

    The Kids are all right and they're all here.The youth music scene in Bend sometimes feels like one of those things that you're pretty sure exists, but you've never actually seen, so you're not sure - like a panda bear or a McRib sandwich. After two years of trying to track down some sort of high school basement show where we could send a youthful reporter (or at least youthful looking reporter), it seemed like we'd found a real-live teen-age rock show. The show at PoetHouse Art on Saturday night was a fundraiser for Rise Up International, the Bend-based socially conscious clothing retailer and humanitarian outfit, and featured a lineup that included names like Mosley Wotta and Empty Space Orchestra, but it was the other acts on the bill like Mirf the Bing and others that filled the room with mostly high-school aged fans.

Outside

Blogs

  • The Blender
  • Weekend Warrior! 12/12-12/13

    Tonight! The Legacy of the Jacksons: Old Mill Martini Bar If you like Michael, Janet, Tito and the rest of 'em, head to the newly revamped Old Mill Martini Bar and get down to a few consecutive hours of music by the entire Jackson family. This is all brought to you by the venerable MC Mystic.

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