The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon | Issue Archives | Mar 26, 2009
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  • Issue of
  • Mar 26 - Apr 1, 2009
  • Vol. 13, No. 13

News

Opinion

  • Letters to the Editor
  • Stop Being So Snide

    Can the editorial staff please do me a favor and stop using parentheses to interject their astute observations of obvious grammatical errors within readers' opinion

Culture

  • Culture Features
  • Keep Your Left Hand Up!: A night at the Golden Gloves

    The work beneath the gloves...Boxers don't walk. Boxers don't strut. Boxers glide, eyes forward, their profiles reminiscent of Dick Tracy, strong and dashing, with a hint of vulnerability that belies the ballet of brutality to come. Noted author Joyce Carol Oates refers to boxing as, "the lost religion of masculinity," and the horde that gathered on a Friday night in the Middle Sister Building of the Deschutes County Fairgrounds for the preliminary bouts of the Oregon State Golden Gloves championship came to re-christen this loss. Men dominated the throng as Ozzy Osbourne, Rammstein and Mexican rap detonated from speakers. The overpowering smell of nachos and popcorn blended with the bittersweet aroma of mixed drinks. The bartender, resplendent in a jewel-toned vest and bow tie, attempted to create a little bit of Las Vegas elegance on a linen-draped card table positioned near a hall water fountain.
  • Culture Features
  • Taking the Apron out of the Kitchen

    Pretty is as pretty does and a flirty apron worn over jeans and a sheer top coyly whispers: "I've got both covered." Similar to the dress with pants trend of the last few years, a smart apron develops the look a step further, exhibiting DIY confidence while maintaining a view of those apple bottom jeans - practical femininity at its finest.
  • Picks
  • Our Picks for the Week of 3/25 - 4/2

    Freestyle Fiasco 9 friday 27 Benevolent local musical guru MC Mystic is joined by DJ Wicked to host the ninth installment of this all-out lyrical battle. There should be an explosion of rhymes blasting from the mouths of our talented local rhymesters, all of it coming right off the top of their domes. All ages, beer garden for 21+. $5. Domino Room, 51 NW Greenwood Ave. C.P.C. friday 27 This band very well might be Bend's best-kept secret. Although they fly largely under the radar, C.P.C. (Concave Perception Chamber) provides one of the craziest sonic presentations to be found here in town. Often psychedelic but always wound around a skillful core, CPC blasts out everything from prog rock to mathematically precise instrumentals. Players Bar & Grill 25 SW Century Dr.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • The Cocktailing: Sucker Punch

    One unfortunate side effect of alcohol is that normally calm and often times bland people will become uncharacteristically headstrong, violent, and/or maniacal. This weekend
  • Chow
  • Better Late Than Never: Breaking Bend's fine-dining mold at Staccato

    Art on the plate: Staccato's Seafood Risotto Among Bend's fine-dining elite, Staccato lives comfortably in the upper stratum. But a few things set it apart from its neighbors. First, it's an upscale restaurant that cannot be classified as New American, Pacific Northwest or, my favorite, "eclectic." Most dishes have a contemporary twist, but Staccato's roots are firmly planted in northern Italian flavors and preparations. Nor does it have that pristine New American feel. Just as the menu blends the old with the new, so does the space. Housed in the 100-year-old fire hall downtown, the 4,500-square-foot building has been converted into four dining areas that have retained much of the old brick-and-stone detail, but have been doused in a distinctly modern wash and dotted with rustic Italian accoutrements and racks of Italian and regional wines (Staccato's list includes over 250 bottles). You could probably apply that description to nine out of 10 dishes on the menu: equally influenced by local ingredients, contemporary flair and traditional Italian recipes.
  • Chow
  • Better Late Than Never: Breaking Bend's fine-dining mold at Staccato

    Art on the plate: Staccato's Seafood Risotto Among Bend's fine-dining elite, Staccato lives comfortably in the upper stratum. But a few things set it apart from its neighbors. First, it's an upscale restaurant that cannot be classified as New American, Pacific Northwest or, my favorite, "eclectic." Most dishes have a contemporary twist, but Staccato's roots are firmly planted in northern Italian flavors and preparations. Nor does it have that pristine New American feel. Just as the menu blends the old with the new, so does the space. Housed in the 100-year-old fire hall downtown, the 4,500-square-foot building has been converted into four dining areas that have retained much of the old brick-and-stone detail, but have been doused in a distinctly modern wash and dotted with rustic Italian accoutrements and racks of Italian and regional wines (Staccato's list includes over 250 bottles). You could probably apply that description to nine out of 10 dishes on the menu: equally influenced by local ingredients, contemporary flair and traditional Italian recipes.
  • Chow
  • The Cocktailing: Sucker Punch

    One unfortunate side effect of alcohol is that normally calm and often times bland people will become uncharacteristically headstrong, violent, and/or maniacal. This weekend

Screen

  • Film
  • Dupe City: Performances shine in romantic con game

    A Ray Bans man.This quick-paced espionage comedy (apparently part of an emerging genre when combined with Burn After Reading) trades blazing guns for sharp-tongued dialogue and finely honed performances. But despite the unconventional delivery, this movie is, at heart, an off-kilter love story that ultimately turns out to be quite conventional. Duplicity starts off promising with crisp, tricky photography, split-screen images and inventive camera angles. The two main characters, Ray (Clive Owen) and Claire (Julia Roberts), come from different secret agent backgrounds and the story unfolds as their romance and inherent distrust of each other progresses. Forming an alliance of sorts, they use their spy talents to go after two huge multinational conglomerates, pitting CEOs Howard Tully and Richard Garsik (Tom Wilkinson and Paul Giamatti, respectively) against each other to embezzle the bejeezus out of them. Ray and Claire plan on cashing in on the divulgence of a new secret product about to bust open on the market. But of course, nothing is as it seems. While gearing up to pay close attention, I found that it wasn't necessary...everything is spelled out for you, albeit disjointedly, then taken away and re-explained.
  • Tags: ,
  • Film
  • Bromantic Comedy: Actors squeeze formulaic plot for all its laughs

    Caution: (working) man in progress.If nothing else, the gay-rights revolution in this country has definitely breeched the dam of repressed, man-on-man hetero love in Hollywood. In the summer of 2007, we had Michael Cera and Jonah Hill (channeling Richard Gere and Julia Roberts) rocking each other to sleep at the end of Superbad. In Knocked Up, Paul Rudd and Seth Rogen seemed to have more romantic chemistry than Rogen and his female co-lead, Katherine Heigl. Now, instead of dancing around the issue of uninhibited man-love, I Love You, Man plunges in. Rudd is back, starring with Jason Segel (the owner of the penis that stole any early scene in Forgetting Sarah Marshall) as a newly engaged real-estate agent who has one big hurdle to his wedding: he doesn't have any true male friends, ergo he doesn't have a best man.
  • Tags: ,

Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • CD Review- The Decemberists: The Hazards of Love

    The Decemberists The Hazards of Love Columbia Records This is how Decemberists front man Colin Meloy described the Portland band's new record, The Hazards of Love, a few months ago: "...the tale of a woman named Margaret who is ravaged by a shape-shifting animal; her lover, William; a forest queen; and a cold-blooded, lascivious rake, who recounts with spine-tingling ease how he came to be living so easy and free."
  • Tags: ,

Outside

  • Natural World
  • The World of Oregon's Weird Wildlife: Introducing you to a couple new species

    The work beneath the gloves...You have to be alert while driving down the highway to observe some of Oregon's more unique forms of wildlife. Take the photo above for example. It isn't often you see one of the Giant Oregon Rock Worms, let alone get close enough to have it almost bite your leg off - and they can do it! If you don't believe that, the next time you're driving over the Santiam Pass to Salem, slow down after you go past Suttle Lake and look at the face of the rocks opposite the lake. You can see the long vertical tunnels some of the smaller rock worms make in the rock. They are vertical to the surface, as rock worms keep their tails above the ground (to breathe) as they dig down, and their flatulence is powerful enough to blow the tunnel in half. With just a little imagination you can see what their teeth must be like, gnawing through lava rock! It's no wonder my daughter Miriam was leaping away! Further down the highway near Detroit Reservoir, you can see where ODOT and OSU wildlife biologists have placed wire netting on the hillside in an effort to capture rock worms and sell them to zoos in other states.
  • Outside Features
  • Corned Beef Hash: On a hare's trail in search of beer and fitness

    The hounds take after the hare...and beer.Sometimes, I'm a little off-kilter, so to speak. Case in point: On St, Patrick's Day, I ended up at a Mexican restaurant with a few friends. I know McMenamins would have been the happening place to be, but the seafood rellenos and the service (since we were the only ones there) at Baltazar's was wonderful. But, hey, this is no restaurant review-I'll leave that to the dining critic. The evening after St.Paddy's Day, I partook in another off-kilter event known as a "Hash." Now that's something you need to know about. By the way, some of what follows is stolen from wikipedia, some from www.gthhh.com, the World Hash House Harrier's website, and the rest I made up.

Blogs

  • The Beacon
  • Episode 1

    What started out as a way for some friends in the snowboard industry to share stories photos and inappropriate content, has morphed itself into an
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