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  • Issue of
  • Apr 23-29, 2009
  • Vol. 13, No. 17

News

  • Local News
  • Muddying The Waters: Mirror Pond sedimentation offers no easy solutions

    Before event organizers moved the Pole Pedal Paddle upstream to the Old Mill in 2004 it wasn't unusual to spot frustrated canoeists and kayakers trying to free their boats from the muck that had gathered just inches underneath the surface of Mirror Pond. Today boaters know better than to venture out of the narrow channel when they paddle Mirror Pond, if they paddle at all. The iconic feature that has framed many a postcard and just happens to adorn the label of Bend's flagship beer is being choked to death by sediment. But fixing the problem involves more than just scooping out a few shovelfuls of dirt. Initial estimates to dredge the pond run between $2 million and $5 million at a time when the city of Bend doesn't have cash to support basic services like buses and road maintenance. And while the city has taken the lead on solutions for our disappearing pond, officials now say they aren't going to foot the bill or subsidize a solution with staff time.

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • "Green" Developers' Scorched-Earth Tactics

    To hear the developers of the Metolian tell it, they're the greenest, tree-huggingest, Earth-lovingest guys who ever walked the planet. But the tactics the developers and their supporters have been employing look more like a scorched-earth policy. They seem to have adopted William Tecumseh Sherman as their role model instead of John Muir. A little background: The Metolian is the smaller of two destination resorts originally proposed for development within the Metolius Basin. Responding to the pleas of thousands of lovers of this irreplaceable scenic, recreational and ecological resource, Gov. Ted Kulongoski asked the state Land Conservation and Development Commission to draw up a plan for its protection. The LCDC plan would allow limited development of both resorts within the basin in exchange for the rights to put larger resorts outside it. Ponderosa Land and Cattle Co., the owner of the land where the bigger resort was supposed to go, apparently feels it can live with that deal. But Dutch Pacific Resources LLC, which wants to develop the Metolian, is fighting the plan because it would be able to build only two residences in the basin if a site can be found elsewhere for its "eco-resort."
  • Letters to the Editor
  • My Dog's No Outlaw

    My dog likes to hike and bike as much as I do. The one-size-fits-all leash laws punish all for the actions of a few. Not to mention that putting dogs on-leash does not necessarily quell the worries over unruly dogs. The dogs that killed Diane Whipple in San Francisco were on-leash, returning from a walk at the time of the attack. I propose that we collaborate on a more sophisticated tiered-licensing system that separates the Cujos from the Lassies. Incidentally, it could be a moneymaker for a resource-limited city. I would happily fork over a $50 fee to participate in the system. I'd even volunteer my time if that would help the city make it happen. It could look something like this:
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Facts vs. Faith

    In Mike Epstein's bashing of the Jesus basher, Steve Humphrey, he asserts that St. Augustine argued God allowed Rome to become a great nation and
  • Letters to the Editor
  • The Bike Brigade

    Hey there to all you fellow riders out there, roadies, mounties and commuters. How about a biker coalition that patrols the roadways and the mountain biking trails? The purpose? We all get flats, have mishaps and need support - even medical aid. Out on the trails, such as Phil's Trail, a coalition would be wonderful with the millions of people coming from every planet around the universe to bike in Bend since this is the best place in the world to bike! (ha,ha...NOT) There are bike coalitions in northern California for a reason, mainly the population of riders being large. There are a lot of riders on the trails and a biker coalition would help educate riders on the right of way, friendliness, littering etc.

Culture

  • Culture Features
  • We Don't Need No Hatchery: Inaugural steelhead festival comes to Old Mill

    The Bucket brings a wild fish to hand in the high desert. You don't have to be a wader-clad and sleep-deprived steelhead fisherman to know that there is something missing in the waters of our once-teeming Northwest rivers, but it doesn't hurt. Steelhead, the iconic fish that once proliferated in rivers from the Oregon coast to the interior of Idaho, are becoming fewer and fewer every year. Even as groups like the Deschutes Basin Land Trust and Confederated Tribes work to restore salmon and steelhead runs on the Upper Deschutes Basin, populations of native fish across the region are falling and in some cases dwindling to the brink of extinction. While hatcheries continue to churn out fish for sport and commercial fisherman, recent studies have confirmed what anybody who has felt the arm-jolting take of a wild fish on a swung fly already knew - hatchery fish are a sub-par species that make a poor substitute for their wild brethren.
  • Picks
  • Our Picks for the Week of 4/22-4/30

    Oregon Reads Reception thursday 23 In a treat for the strong contingent of literary folks here in Bend, all three authors from the Oregon Reads project are featured in one event. Lauren Kessler, author of Stubborn Twig, is an account of three generations of Japanese Americans living in Oregon, will be on hand along with Virginia Euwer Wolff and Deborah Hopkinson, the authors of this year's selections for younger readers. All three will read and be available to sign books. Also, you can catch Kessler at the Tower on Friday night for a free event featuring the Taiko drummers out of Portland. 7pm Bend Public Library, 601 NW Wall St. 312-1032. 40 oz To Freedom, Mirf the Bing thursday 23 Mirf the Bing.We told you, albeit briefly, about this San Diego-based act last week, but figured we would mention that the Sublime tribute act is here in town to drop some summery sounds to go with this summery weather we've been experiencing. Local high school dudes, Mirf the Bing, open the show with a set of reggae and ska originals that have the youth set buzzing loudly. 7:30pm. $10. Domino Room, 51 NW Greenwood Ave.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • Home at Last: Chloe at FivePine shines in its new digs

    Dishes go global at Chloe. In the year and a half that Chloe was open in Redmond, the restaurant gained a considerable reputation and loyal following despite its strip-mall location. Chef Jerry Phaisavath and his wife Elaine, however, sought a new space that would be more compatible with what they envisioned, where they could take Chloe to the next level. They have found it in Sisters. Opening in January at the FivePine complex just as you enter town from the south on Highway 20, Chloe has really come into its own. From the menu to the décor to the service, it's hard to imagine that the restaurant was ever anywhere else. The room, awash in earth tones, wood and stone, stands out from its white-tablecloth, New-American brethren. Stylized scenes, shapes and materials taken from nature are cleverly incorporated into every surface and accessory. There's a terrarium built into the wall by the host stand. The ceiling above the clover of semicircular booths in the center of the room features tiny twinkling lights against a black background emulating the night sky. Upholstery is modern, but if you look closely you'll find a geometrical pattern of oblong leaves. By far my favorite touch is the basket-woven moose head mounted over the fireplace in the cozy bar area. From the light fixtures to the cutlery (the knives have flat handles perpendicular to the blade so it stands up straight when set down), you can tell that every detail was carefully considered.
  • Chow
  • Home at Last: Chloe at FivePine shines in its new digs

    Dishes go global at Chloe. In the year and a half that Chloe was open in Redmond, the restaurant gained a considerable reputation and loyal following despite its strip-mall location. Chef Jerry Phaisavath and his wife Elaine, however, sought a new space that would be more compatible with what they envisioned, where they could take Chloe to the next level. They have found it in Sisters. Opening in January at the FivePine complex just as you enter town from the south on Highway 20, Chloe has really come into its own. From the menu to the décor to the service, it's hard to imagine that the restaurant was ever anywhere else. The room, awash in earth tones, wood and stone, stands out from its white-tablecloth, New-American brethren. Stylized scenes, shapes and materials taken from nature are cleverly incorporated into every surface and accessory. There's a terrarium built into the wall by the host stand. The ceiling above the clover of semicircular booths in the center of the room features tiny twinkling lights against a black background emulating the night sky. Upholstery is modern, but if you look closely you'll find a geometrical pattern of oblong leaves. By far my favorite touch is the basket-woven moose head mounted over the fireplace in the cozy bar area. From the light fixtures to the cutlery (the knives have flat handles perpendicular to the blade so it stands up straight when set down), you can tell that every detail was carefully considered.
  • Beer & Drink
  • The Spitter

    There are some things that are never OK, for example spitting on the floor in a public place. I make reference to the gentleman on Saturday night who convincingly hucked a huge loogie high into the air so that it landed in a slimy spat in the middle of the bar area. Instantaneously, I told him that he had to leave and when I came round to show him the way out he replied, "I'm not drunk! I haven't even been drinking." Which is unfortunate because then he would have an excuse for his absolutely insolent behavior. This isn't the first time I've had to kick someone out of the bar for spitting on the floor. The other time was many years ago when I had a guy from Oklahoma who kept expectorating on the floor for no apparent reason other than he clearly thought that our wood floor would be more pleasant with a good spit-shine. When I told him that if he hucked on the floor one more time he would have to leave, he quickly proceeded to spit again, as obviously he was accustomed to dribbling as he pleased, much like a slobbering bulldog. On his way out he excused himself by stating he was from Oklahoma. Which don't get me wrong, we all know that Oklahoma has more than its fair share of rednecks and hicks, however I have never met another Oklahoman who thinks that it is OK to spit inside.
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Screen

  • Film
  • Shock Value: High Voltage cranks it up

    Shock me baby...all night long.Crank: High Voltage is an adrenalized rollercoaster ride presented in overtly stylized hyper-surrealism. It's what the remakes of Death Race and Fast and Furious strived to be. The original Crank lifted its concept from the classic D.O.A. starring Edmund O'Brien (re-made later with Dennis Quaid and Meg Ryan). The hitman, Chev Chelios (Jason Statham), mysteriously poisoned by a "Beijing Cocktail," races against time to find his perpetrators. If Chev's heart rate slowed down he'd croak. To keep his adrenaline up, he was off and running, punching anyone in his path. This sequel takes up the storyline when Chev falls from a helicopter. After splattering onto pavement, he is literally scooped up by some evil Chinese gangsters who want to harvest his super organs. To keep him alive they transplant a battery powered heart that needs a charge every hour or so. When they start to harvest Chelios' well-endowed man part, he spurs back to life and the pummeling begins. He spends the rest of the film repeatdly jump-starting his heart any way possible.
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  • Film
  • Just Add Watergate: Political conspiracy thriller is paint-by-numbers, but effective

    Journalists? They still have those?Think of all the things that people have seen with great repetition in their lives but for which we continue to crane our necks to glimpse again and again: Sunrises, sunsets, windstorms, the aftermath of car crashes, Seth Rogen movies, etc. In a way, State of Play is the film version of a sunrise - or at least a good morning coffee. We know precisely what we're being fed, and that's why we keep coming back for more. That being said, State of Play throws enough twists around to give this daily cup of Joe a pleasant aroma. Adapted from a BBC television series of the same name, the film stars Ben Affleck as Stephen Collins, a congressman with a bright future whose office assistant dies under bizarre circumstances. Russell Crowe plays Cal McAffrey, a streetwise journalist and old friend of the congressman, who begins investigating the aide's death and its connection to the murders of two other people. Things get murky when it turns out the married Collins and the assistant were having an affair. Still murkier is that Collins is skewering a private defense contractor at a congressional hearing, and the defense contractor doesn't like it one bit. Billions in no-bid contracts could be lost. And when billions are at stake, lives aren't worth much, so people get killed. Rinse and repeat, right?
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  • Film Events
  • Stealth Wars: Newest Riddick delivers but doesn't dazzle

    Kill, Kill, Kill. Hunter or hunted? I can never tell. Crawling through tight steel airducts, hesitating every time I hear a guard's voice, I feel like I did when I was escaping prison-hunted, fearful and sneaking in order to stay alive. But when I'm in a dark room with the mercenaries piloting this ship, who stand unaware as I creep up behind them with my knives poised to open their throats, I remember that I'm a hunter-one of the galaxy's greatest monsters. Like the Metal Gear Solid games, The Chronicles of Riddick: Assault on Dark Athena is a hybrid game of action and stealth. Killing and hiding alternate seamlessly as I guide Riddick, the shaved-headed hero voiced by Vin Diesel, as he attempts to elude-and eliminate-the mercenaries who captured him after he escaped his last adventure.
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Hardly Clumsy: Emma Hill boards her own bus

    Emma Hill: Always up for a good disguise.The last time Emma Hill played Bend, she told us about touring the West Coast by bus - Greyhound bus that is. We caught up with Hill on the eve of the release of her new record and a release party at the Tower Theatre and learned that she still plans on touring by bus this summer. But this time it's her own bus - a "short bus" she bought from a church group in Arizona and plans to outfit with some personal touches before she and her band crisscross the country...after finishing up the school year at Portland State, of course. Transportation changes are not the only shift for Hill since she packed the Silver Moon in January of 2008, as evidenced by her new album, Clumsy Seduction. The record showcases the 21-year-old's gradual shift from songwriting darling to folk powerhouse. On Clumsy Seduction, Hill is backed by a six-piece band, thus changing the name of her act to Emma Hill and Her Gentleman Callers, and also allowing her to push her style closer to that of Neko Case (and sometimes Jenny Lewis) and away from the whimsical folkie she played (and played well) on her earlier release, Just Me.
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • A Loud Experience: Back from SXSW, the Pink Snowflakes return to Bend

    Sunshine, lollipops and plenty of feedback.The last time the Pink Snowflakes played in Bend, they brought their bubble machine madness to Players Bar and Grill for a set of the Portland band's quirky and loud-as-hell psychedelic rock. Back in town this weekend, the band has covered some new ground since the last visit, mainly in the form of a trek down to Austin, Texas where they added their name to the list of 1,800 some bands that performed at the storied South by Southwest festival. For a band that seems to pride itself on weirdness, the Pink Snowflakes kept it true to form at SXSW - where guitarist Tom McGregor admits the band had "no idea what we were getting ourselves into" - playing a show at a venue that professed a "clothing-optional" policy. "We figured it out a week or two before we left and thought it would be perfect because we're all about the slightly weird and thought it would be great to be listening to this loud, crazy psychedelic rock and freaking out to it," says McGregor over the phone from his Portland home, "But there only ended up being one guy naked and it was the guy in charge."

Outside

  • Natural World
  • Cry Wolf: Wolves to be de-listed...Is that really a good idea?

    Editors note: This is the first in a two-part essay about the proposal to remove wolves from the federal Endangered Species List. Preparing for life on the De-List?Well, it sounds like those ranchers in Wyoming who shot and killed the ("misbehaving") wolves that (allegedly) killed their livestock (and immediately posted photos to prove what mighty hunters they are), and others of their ilk are going to get their way. There is a move afoot with the feds to remove wolves from the Endangered Species List before they even get the opportunity to enjoy roaming free in Oregon. Even with President Obama's call for "good science," it may just be that he picked the wrong guy to run the Dept. of Interior. Secretary Ken Salazar, a rancher turned politician from Colorado, wants to follow the flawed Bush Bunch and keep the "Big Bad Wolf" syndrome alive.
  • Outside Features
  • May Days: Mountain biking and PPPing

    April Shower bring May Flowers-as well as mountain bike races and Pole Pedal Paddle. WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY Mountain Biking season has arrived! The WebCyclery Cascade ChainBreaker Mountain Bike Race, the traditional opener in Central Oregon, is coming May 10. Yes, that's Mother's Day- last year, Barry Wicks brought his mom to the race. Beating the Sandtrap: Mountain Biking Millican OHV Trails in SpringThe race will use the same course as last year-the Cascade Timberlands property just west of Shevlin Park, which is a great mix of singletrack, doubletrack, short climbs, dry creekbed crossings, a gravel road or two and a few man-made obstacles. Categories will include: Pro = FAST! Cat 1 = Experienced riders with lots of mojo Cat 2 = Riders looking for adventure and working on speed to move up to Cat 1 Cat 3 = New to the sport and out for a good time Singlespeed = One gear, simplicity and some pain Tandem = Two riders, one really big bike Don't miss this big event-over 200 cyclists compete and over $1,000 in cash and prizes will be awarded. For more information, visit www.webcyclery.com.

Blogs

  • The Blender
  • Emma Hill Video

    Portland songstress Emma Hill stopped off at the Tower Theatre last weekend to celebrate the release of her new disc, Clumsy Seduction, along with her
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  • The Blender
  • Last Night's Comedy

    If you weren't one of the folks who crammed themselves into the second level stage of the Summit last night, you missed a wacky comedy
  • Tags:

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