The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon | Issue Archives | May 21, 2009
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  • Issue of
  • May 21-27, 2009
  • Vol. 13, No. 21

News

  • Local News
  • When The Well Runs Dry

    Shortly before the Oregon Legislature released its revenue forecast last week, providing details of its budget for the fiscal biennium, State Economist Tom Potiowsky issued

Opinion

  • Letters to the Editor
  • The More Things Change

    Meg says old school Republicans are scared. Well, what exactly is a new school Republican? What do they believe? That gay marriage should remain illegal,
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Too Hump To Handle

    You know what I'm tired of...? People who bash I Love Television and its ingenious author, Steven Humphrey! There have been weeks when the only

Culture

  • Book Talk
  • Book Review: Thanks for the Memories, George

    Thanks For the Memories, George By Mike Loew Three Rivers Press Reading through to the end of Thanks For the Memories, George is not unlike sitting down with friends for breakfast in a seedy diner the morning after a brutal all-night bender on the town. Somewhere deep down, you know exactly what happened, but you need to have it all recounted to you - even the embarrassingly awful parts - just to make sure that it really happened. Mike Loew, a contributor to the hilariously satirical Onion, uses this look back at the Bush presidency to remind us that the last eight years were really not too far off from a long and especially brutal bender. And now Loew is here to sit us down in that diner and tell us what the hell just happened.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • Zydeco Steps on 28's Turf: Is Bond Street big enough for the both of them?

    Eat large with small plates at 28.Anyone who grew up with a big brother, particularly one that is handsome and talented, knows how it feels when said sibling invades the little niche that you have diligently and meticulously carved out for yourself, that tiny corner of the world where you shine the brightest. With one step into your sacred space, he steals your thunder, along with all the attention and probably a few of your friends. Being just such a little sister myself, I immediately thought of 28, a fixture on Bond for the past three years and the second child of owners Steve and Cheri Helt, when big bro Zydeco opened last month in its new downtown location right across the street. As a diner, of course I'm thrilled to have the whole brood in town. A recent visit to the new Zydeco showed that, though the decor is slightly more sterile than it was at the old location, the service remains impeccable and the menu is largely unchanged. Every bite was as impressive as always. But while lavishing my attention on the new kid on the block, I felt a little like a traitor to my kind and increasingly compelled to throw 28 some much deserved love-for little sisters everywhere.
  • Chow
  • Zydeco Steps on 28's Turf: Is Bond Street big enough for the both of them?

    Eat large with small plates at 28.Anyone who grew up with a big brother, particularly one that is handsome and talented, knows how it feels when said sibling invades the little niche that you have diligently and meticulously carved out for yourself, that tiny corner of the world where you shine the brightest. With one step into your sacred space, he steals your thunder, along with all the attention and probably a few of your friends. Being just such a little sister myself, I immediately thought of 28, a fixture on Bond for the past three years and the second child of owners Steve and Cheri Helt, when big bro Zydeco opened last month in its new downtown location right across the street. As a diner, of course I'm thrilled to have the whole brood in town. A recent visit to the new Zydeco showed that, though the decor is slightly more sterile than it was at the old location, the service remains impeccable and the menu is largely unchanged. Every bite was as impressive as always. But while lavishing my attention on the new kid on the block, I felt a little like a traitor to my kind and increasingly compelled to throw 28 some much deserved love-for little sisters everywhere.
  • Beer & Drink
  • A Good Thumping

    No one can escape the excitement leading up to the Pole, Pedal, Paddle in Bend. And the bar was no exception. Our sites were set high on beating our bitter rival, Thump Coffee. One might think that after my last experience at the PPP, I would never return to compete, but alas I relented. Three years ago, my husband and I tackled the challenge. We were sporty, in good shape and avid outdoorsmen; how could we not battle in Bend's ultimate contest? Brad was off to a swift start and came quickly down the mountain to jump right into the skate ski. Neither of us skate skied, but figured "how hard can it be?" As we began screaming at one another because Brad couldn't get his boot into the rental ski bindings, I recognized that we didn't have a damn clue what we were doing. Brad kept the skis on for about 10 minutes when he figured he'd be faster in an ungainly snow jog as bright yellow spandex whisked by. For over an hour, I stood patiently at my bike with cold cramped feet and an attitude that greatly improved once it occurred to me to wait in the car. A loud knock and a wicked scowl scared me onto the bike where I pedaled swiftly down the mountain and got to the run where my legs were jello. For the first mile I could barely stand much less run and I had to piss like a racehorse so all I could focus on was finding some sort of privacy. I tagged Brad at the paddle, where he paddled the entire length in a six-foot creek boat with perfect strokes as school children with upside-down paddles passed him in 17-foot race boats. By the time I got to the sprint, the damage had been done. We knew that we hadn't been competitive, but when we saw our names last in our class, we had to admit to the world that we were losers.
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Screen

  • Film
  • Lofty Expectations: Pixar's Up plays its best card early, leaving simple summer adventure

    I told you pesky kids to stay off my porch.Early in Up-the tenth feature from the cinematic quality machine called Pixar-there's a sequence that distills all of the best that the animation powerhouse brings to filmmaking. After a brief prologue introducing us to a pair of simpatico kids named Carl and Ellie in the 1930s, we watch without a word of dialogue as the childhood friends become sweethearts, then follow them through 50 years of married life. As Up moves into its primary storyline, that's the challenge co-writer/director Pete Docter (Monsters, Inc.) faces. In the present day, Carl (Edward Asner) is now a curmudgeonly septuagenarian, living alone in his house while high-rise development goes on around him. Facing the prospect of life in a retirement home, Carl instead sends a massive cascade of balloons through his chimney, launching the house into the air with a plan to head to a remote South American jungle There's also an unexpected hitchhiker: Russell (Jordan Nagai), a young Wilderness Explorer who didn't take the hint that Carl didn't want to be helped across the street.
  • Film
  • Enliven Up!: Twisting pretzel regime needs a boost

    Filmmaker and yoga enthusiast Kate Churchill had a goal for her documentary: find a novice yoga student and give him six months to transform physically and spiritually through yoga. She picks Nick Rosen, a rock climber/journalist whose father is a corporate lawyer and mother is a shaman healer. She introduces Nick to many of the American "Baskin Robbins choices" of yoga, and then takes him to India to learn directly from the great masters. Enlighten Up! skims the surface of every encounter, not to mention yoga in general. And the by-the-numbers documentary has its moments, but not enough of them. Beginning with talking head testimonials from internationally known yoga instructors who explain that there are exceptions and contradictions to all rules, it briefly cuts back and forth with mixed messages and innuendoes instead of information. It's easy to tell from the first five minutes that Nick isn't going to get it. Even as every single spiritual guru tells him that "the brain is not the boss," "don't dwell on thoughts," "keep practicing yoga and let it happen," Nick constantly resists and stonewalls. While the focus is on Nick the skeptic, the narration amateurishly switches between Nick and Kate, with both figures having dramatic moments. Thanks to Kate's off-camera remarks and input, it's obvious she is being affected by the events in the film. But behind the scenes, she proves to be more distracting than beneficial.
  • Film Events
  • Bikini Kill: The first deliberate attempt to lower the bar

    MEETING TRANSCRIPT: Head Corporate Communications D3Publisher of America Inc.; Head Tamsoft Marketing Translate from Japanese original by global corporate communications (Intern G. Haku) "See. Kind of skimpy cowboy showgirl Amazon outfit." "In heels." "Yes, in heels. And in 3D! But options. See... silvery single-thread thong. Also schoolgirl outfit. All options. And then the zombies arrive and then 'Point Get'!" "She's a panting schoolgirl getting chased by zombies?" "But she has the sword of blood for killing the zombies. See the zombie legs totter towards her! And yet she will slay them mercilessly!" "So sort of a Castlevania meets, I don't know, Showgirls?" "Yes, showgirls! And show girls taking the strong and interesting route to power. Young girl power. They demonstrate joyous power." "She's pretty joyous. She's jiggling a lot." "She fights the hulk of quivering blood."
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • CD Review: Mostly Mostest

    The Mostest Masala Mostest If you think that the Mostest is essentially the collective name of anyone who plays in any capacity of Bend's roots music scene, well, you're not far off. The collective, captained by all-around music man Mark Ransom, has long rotated a slew of musicians in and out of its lineup, keeping what appears to be an open-door policy to its membership, culminating in live performances in which the stage looks as crowded as the cover of Sgt.
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  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Beyond Sonic Intentions: Heavyweight Dub Champion finally unleashes its second brain-bending album

    A whole lotta knobs and a whole lotta dreads.By the time I wrap up my interview with Heavyweight Dub Champion's Resurrector - my second in two and a half years - I'm a little worn out. And a little curious, as well as a bit angry and slightly inspired. I'm not pissed off or inspired necessarily by Resurrector or his band or its elaborately constructed new record, Rise of the Champion Nation, but just generally overwhelmed by the sociology lesson I've just absorbed and further curious about some simple things Resurrector has told me about how the world works, including, but not limited to the swine flu hysteria of 2009. Remember that? Roll back your Twitter log a few weeks and you'll find it there in your friend's then supposedly reasonable fears of collapsing in the streets along with the rest of humanity. As HDC's producer and ringleader, Resurrector (real name: Grant Chambers) enjoys discussing the San Francisco collective, which sounds something like hip-hop colliding with dub inside the eye of an electronica hurricane, and its philosophy as much as it is music. The overarching idea: "To lift the veil of perception." HDC is all about conveying an ultimate message, and not in the way that Michael Franti is trying to deliver a message. In fact, HDC's devotion to its message makes Franti seem as trivial as Katy Perry and her penchant for same-sex kissing.
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Gorge Yourself: Anybody heading up to Sasquatch?

    And that's just the side stage. Yup, Sasquatch is a pretty big deal.The wait is finally over for the most anticipated music festival in the Northwest. Hope you got your tickets early because Saturday and Sunday are both sold out! Sasquatch starts the weekend off with a big bang at the Gorge Amphitheater. The Decemberists, Animal Collective, Devotchka and Mos Def are among the artists kicking off the festival on Saturday. The biggest acts of the night will be headliners Kings of Leon and Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Kings of Leon are touring in support of their latest album Only By The Night. No doubt, on Saturday you'll be able to catch their irresistible single "Sex on Fire." I am kicking myself for not getting tickets, solely for the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Be sure to bring your dancing shoes because Karen O and the boys will have you grooving to the beats of their latest album It's Blitz! So, don't be a "Zero" and miss this performance because "Heads Will Roll."

Outside

  • Outside Features
  • Red Sox Hate-ion

    You have the hat, and the t-shirt and the fake New England accent. Congratulations. You're a phony baloney Boston Red Sox fan and Left Field probably scowled at you last weekend up in Seattle where we set up camp for the weekend series against the Mariners. Now, let's get one thing straight: Red Sox fans are endlessly better than Yankees fans. And, Red Sox fans have a sort of blue-collar, beer-drinking folksiness about them that's easy to like. But it's the bandwagon Red Sox fans that bought a cap when Johnny Damon and Manny Ramirez (now a Yankee and a drug user, respectively) led the magical team of 2004 to victory and now deem it necessary to root against their home team every time the Red Sox come to town. By Left Field's estimate, about one in four Safeco Field seats were occupied by Red Sox fans - who gladly chanted "Let's go Red Sox" ad nausea, which in a visiting ballpark is the equivalent to walking over to your neighbor's home for the express purpose of taking a paint-peeling dump. There are some things you just don't do away from home.
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Special Issues & Guides

  • Dining Guide
  • Calling All High Chairs

    Flatbread hits all the right notes when it's family time.When you've got kids in tow, eating out is a luxury. But sometimes it's also a
  • Dining Guide
  • Suds and Grub

    Chef Matt Neltner from Deschutes Brewery with anothr perfect pairing.Any decent cooking or etiquette class arms you with the basic knowledge that red wines go
  • Dining Guide
  • Restaurant of the Year: Ariana

    When it comes to restaurants, of course it's highly subjective, but there are some specific considerations: execution, presentation, creativity, ambience, service, value, consistency, attention to detail. When the field is as deep as it is here in Central Oregon, however, the deciding factor is often harder to articulate. It's that quality that makes your eyes roll with every bite, that makes you inhale deeply as you swallow so as not to waste that last vestige of flavor, where nothing in the overall dining experience distracts you from your appreciation. It's what makes you remember and relive the meal weeks or months later. It's when the very character of the restaurant embodies the values and tastes of a given place at a given time.

Blogs

  • The Wandering Eye
  • Republicanomics, Explained

    Having a hard time understanding the Republican position on Oregon's economic problems? It's easy once you grasp the basic principles of Republicanomics.

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