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  • Issue of
  • May 28 - Jun 3, 2009
  • Vol. 13, No. 22

News

Opinion

  • Letters to the Editor
  • Just Say Nano

    Nothing demonstrates the nature if the Orwellian world we live in more than the official story and cover up of 9/11. Big Brother (in George Orwell's book "1984") demanded that people accept and believe that 2 + 2 =5. Big Brer Fox (News) and other contemporary mind manipulators want us to accept mathematical and scientific anomalies in order to believe the official version of the 9/11 attacks. The jig is up now. Independent scientists have put samples of the World Trade Center dust under a microscope and have identified residues of the explosive, nano-thermite, in three different phases: burnt, partially burnt and unburnt. Results of their findings have been printed in a peer-reviewed journal to be scrutinized by scientists and other critical thinkers worldwide.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Low Leash Esteem

    It's been several weeks now since my dog has been 'attacked' while on-leash and I've been debating whether to write this letter because he can't

Culture

  • Culture Features
  • Slideshows on Fire: Ignite Bend displays the power of Power Point

    Next slide, please.It's tough to get excited about Power Point presentations. Who would believe the software that your company's HR departments uses to outline the new personal day policy and your professor employs to bullet point the notable events of the Crimean War could possibly lend itself to anything even mildly entertaining? Yet this conference room slideshow software is perhaps the key ingredient for the June 4th Ignite Bend event at the Tower Theatre. And unlike those HR presentations, the event should prove to be a big draw. Ignite events have been flourishing across the country for three years now and the concept landed in Bend in February when the first-ever Ignite Bend took place. The concept is pretty simple: Each presenter has five minutes of stage time in which they present 20 different automatically rotating 15-second slides. Once the slideshow starts, it doesn't stop, regardless of the performance - which range from informative lectures to musical comedy routines to performance art. At the first Ignite Bend, there was a presentation on the correlations between poker and life, a defense of local Christians, a talk on the history of Legos and a song about getting laid off.
  • Picks
  • Our Picks for the Week of 5/27 - 6/4

    David Jacobs-Strain thursday 28 We'll tell you one more time to see one of the blues world's brightest young stars while you have the chance. Sure, he comes around a couple times a year, but that's not an excuse to miss him, ever. 8pm. $7. Silver Moon Brewing Co. 24 NW Greenwood Ave. Ian Tyson and Corb Lund thursday 28 You'd probably know a lot more about Ian Tyson than you currently do if you were Canadian. This rodeo rider turned songwriter is the author of the hit song "Four Strong Winds" which was later recorded by both Neil Young and Johnny Cash. Now 75 years old, Tyson is still busy touring and laying down records. This time around he's on the road with fellow Canadian country star Corb Lund. 7pm. $45 or $40. Tower Theatre, 835 NW Wall St.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • Corner Store Attitude with Sophisticated Tastes: Jackson's Corner Finds the Perfect Combination

    A veggie sandwich on focacia served with sunshine at Jackson's Corner.It's rare to find an environment where freelancers with laptops, ladies who lunch, families with children and neighborhood locals are equally comfortable, but less than a year after opening, Jackson's Corner has achieved that and more. In attitude, it certainly has the feel of "corner store," which reflects its location in the historic Delaware Market building. Though you're out of luck if you're expecting to pick up your groceries-unless, of course, your diet consists entirely of gourmet condiments, Kettle Chips, many and varied local and international beers and organic cat food. But behind the curiously stocked shelves is a kitchen of the highest caliber, and in the end, isn't that what you'd rather have on your corner? It also doesn't hurt that the open, bright space, dominated by blonde wood and brick, has something for pretty much everyone. It's perfect for your morning coffee and croissant with the paper, a lunch meeting or takeout for the office (it's just blocks from downtown) or a couple of pints with a sandwich at one of the sidewalk tables on a summer day. As Jackson's is rather near my corner, I've spent an afternoon or two plugged in at the window counter using the free wi-fi (as I am now) and have never felt pressured by the friendly staff to wrap it up after my meal was finished.
  • Chow
  • Corner Store Attitude with Sophisticated Tastes: Jackson's Corner Finds the Perfect Combination

    A veggie sandwich on focacia served with sunshine at Jackson's Corner.It's rare to find an environment where freelancers with laptops, ladies who lunch, families with children and neighborhood locals are equally comfortable, but less than a year after opening, Jackson's Corner has achieved that and more. In attitude, it certainly has the feel of "corner store," which reflects its location in the historic Delaware Market building. Though you're out of luck if you're expecting to pick up your groceries-unless, of course, your diet consists entirely of gourmet condiments, Kettle Chips, many and varied local and international beers and organic cat food. But behind the curiously stocked shelves is a kitchen of the highest caliber, and in the end, isn't that what you'd rather have on your corner? It also doesn't hurt that the open, bright space, dominated by blonde wood and brick, has something for pretty much everyone. It's perfect for your morning coffee and croissant with the paper, a lunch meeting or takeout for the office (it's just blocks from downtown) or a couple of pints with a sandwich at one of the sidewalk tables on a summer day. As Jackson's is rather near my corner, I've spent an afternoon or two plugged in at the window counter using the free wi-fi (as I am now) and have never felt pressured by the friendly staff to wrap it up after my meal was finished.

Screen

  • Film
  • They'll Be Back: Action is Terminator's salvation

    You're lucky you're not a stage hand, my friend...Terminator Salvation could very well be the best action blockbuster of the summer and by far the best of 2009. This flick excels in delivering non-stop and well-timed action scenes without skimping on plot. As a great, high energy battle-for-survival adventure, Terminator Salvation's level of intensity never stops. The prequel to the first Terminator takes place in 2018 wherein John Connor (Christian Bale) has to find and save young Kyle Reese (Anton Yelchin of Charlie Bartlett fame) from the artificial intelligence military organization Skynet (based in a dilapidated San Francisco) and their robot machines. Connor has to make sure Reese stays alive so he can eventually be sent to the past to have sex with his mother so he (Connor) can be born. Got it? Connor must then battle the terminator army and move mountains (sometimes literally) to convince the underground resistance to help save mankind from an evil transport machine while they attempt to overthrow the machine-protected government. Introduced to move the plot along, a new character, Marcus (Sam Worthington) helps to reveal the underlying motives and prejudices of both sides. To the plot's credit, it stands alone as an action flick, but also works well as the beginning to the Terminator series, incorporating all the things any loyal fan would pick up on (the photo of Sarah Connor from the original, her recorded instructions to Connor). What works so well with this flick is that it follows a bunch of distinct sub plots, from Marcus' origin to Reese's underground resistance and capture to Connor's quest and blatant disregard for authority against all odds. Connor's motivational radio messages come across like a good version of Mata Hari.
  • Film
  • Two Wheels on Screen: Introducing the Bend Bicycle Film Festival

    The Banana and the Monkey Man - seen around town.Solidifying our place as Bicycle Town U.S.A. has taken some work. We have miles and miles of trails, locally grown road-riding talent of the highest order as well as a massive number of bike commuters and cycling shops. But now we can add another notch in our bicycling belt in the birth of the Bend Bicycle Film Festival. Similar in format to the always popular Powderhound Review, the event is a catch all of sorts for all films relating to bicycling. Given our community's penchant for two wheelers, there was hardly a shortage of submissions. One of the festival's organizers, Bill Warburton, says that they received 24 submissions and hope to get somewhere between 15 and 20 of those films into the hour and a half slated for local programming. A fundraiser for the Central Oregon Trail Alliance and the Bend Cycling Club, the Bend Bicycle Film Festival covers the wide variety of cycling mediums, including a piece on unicycling as well as footage from last year's Cyclocross championships.
  • Film Events
  • Honor The Code: Avalon Code puts players in charge

    Calling all introverts.Streaming video. Digital pictures. Audio files. Like the most active types of media at the beginning of the 21st Century, videogames are composed of electronic impulses. Any digital work of art is encoded in countless electrical on/off signals the same way that a symphony is encoded in sounds and silences. The electronic codes are the binary beats of the digital age. But videogames blur the line between viewer/listener/creator/audience. They make us all players of the work of art. Some part of every game's design is unbalanced unless a player makes a decision-Up or down? Yes or no? Blue pill or red pill?-and shifts the play in that direction. There is always a choice for the gamer. But since everything in a videogame is part of a code, anything can ultimately be manipulated by the person who has access to it. Normally it's only the creator of a videogame who gets to decide how strong the monsters are, or what kind of weapons they'll have when they appear. But Avalon Code is a role-playing game that lets players determine-using a magical book called the Book of Prophecy-the qualities of almost anything in the game.
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • CD Review - Kim Kelley: Bending Blue

    Smooth, Deep and Local Kim Kelley Bending Blue Odds are over the years you've heard the velvety vocals of long-time Bend resident Kim Kelley. She started out as the lead singer and banjo player in bluegrass band Mean Willy. Maybe you caught her in the folk/fusion band Goober. Most recently, Kelley's gone solo and has been performing around town with other local musicians like Deb Yager. Kelley's been warming up for the release of her debut solo disc Bending Blue, a soulful, folksy album featuring striking vocals and irresistibly smooth rhythms. The music behind the personal lyrics is strong with percussion on many of the songs blending with the folk melodies to create memorable beats like on "Into Your Blue," "Earth" and "Together."
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  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Same Guys, Different Sound: Former Kaddisfly members take a new direction with Water & Bodies

    Mirrors, Water and Bodies.Reinventing one's self is tough. Just ask Michael Vick. But for a band, it's not always that hard. There're myriad acts that have disappeared for a bit, then returned, sometimes triumphantly, sometimes not, with a new look and sound. Radiohead, of course, did it. And so did Fleetwood Mac back in the day. For Water & Bodies, the reinvention is a little more complex than simply rolling out a new mission statement. The Portland band, two members of which are Bend natives, is essentially the same lineup as the indie and slightly emo rock band Kaddisfly, who maintained a steady and loyal following for much of the past decade. But after bassist Kile Brewster left the band over the winter, the remaining four members decided to put the Kaddisfly name and sound to bed. And thus was Water & Bodies born.

Outside

  • Natural World
  • Revisiting the Silent Spring: The need for clean waters

    Male Pacific Tree Frog singing his Song of Spring.The frogs we hear singing their hearts out every evening are our tiny Pacific Tree Frog, Pseudacris regilla, a common species throughout the Northwest. They range from Northern California, all through Oregon and Washington, British Columbia, and eastward to Idaho, Montana and Nevada. These little guys come in shades of greens or browns, and can be found from sea level up to over 11,000 feet, as well as our dry, cold High Desert. Male tree frogs begin the mating business in early spring (and there are many of us who have heard them practicing in our basements on warm winter nights); they migrate to ponds, where they all start singing at once, and very loudly. The guy with the loudest voice gets to mate first with the females laying their eggs on and under vegetation and leaf litter in shallow, calm, clean water. And they are a hardy bunch; they have to be to survive "spring" in Central Oregon. If the eggs are not eaten by salamanders or snakes, embryos will become tadpoles within one to three weeks. If the tadpoles are not eaten by salamanders, snakes and herons, the tadpoles will feed on periphyton, filamentous algae, diatoms and pollen in and on the surface of the water. If they are not eaten by bigger salamanders, snakes, fish, bullfrogs, kingfishers or herons, about two and a half months later, the tadpole's metamorphosis is complete and they leave the water as frogs and become terrestrial predators on arthropods.
  • Outside Features
  • Live in the Moment: Reminders from a tragedy and man's best friend

    STEVE LARSEN REMEMBERED Dogs don't just live in the moment-they lick it, roll in it and breathe it in.Bend lost one of its greatest athletes last week. Steve Larsen, who was only 39, collapsed during a running workout at the Cascade Middle School track on Tuesday May 19th and died. Shock waves rippled through the Bend community. "It was sad and very shocking," said Max King, who was leading the workout. "I had them doing a standard track workout.  Four sets of a tempo pace 1000m, followed by a 5K pace 800m. We had just started and we were in the middle of the first 800m. He just went down to the track on his hands then rolled to his back. Some people thought he had pulled a muscle at first. It was obvious pretty much right away though that something more was wrong. We started CPR immediately and within four to five minutes the ambulance was there. Unfortunately in this case nothing we could have done would have saved him. There were several nurses and multiple people trained in CPR. We did everything we were trained to do. I'm proud of the group of people I have out there. They were amazing." I first met Steve when he was 21 years old and racing for the U.S. National Cycling Team. Two years older than Lance Armstrong, he was definitely one of our brightest young stars. Steve raced on the Motorola team with Lance for three years in the early 1990s, racing in the Giro d'Italia and other major European events. He was probably the only professional to compete in the world championships for road, mountain bike, track, cyclocross, triathlon and off-road triathlon.

Special Issues & Guides

  • Dining Guide
  • Chef's Choice: James Malone, Staccato at the Firehall

     Hola! Enchiladas Queretanas What makes your favorite dish taste so good? Is it only the quality and freshness of the ingredients? Is it the presentation? Does the service and ambience affect your palette? I feel it takes multiple elements working in a symbiotic fashion to create a great experience, i.e.
  • Dining Guide
  • Sorry, We're Open

    The only question about La Rosa's late-night scene is whether you can get a seat.Bend's reputation as a town of early birds is slowly but
  • Dining Guide
  • Don't Worry, Be Happy

    Playing hooky at the BlacksmithLet's be honest, the recession hasn't been any easier on Central Oregon's restaurants than it's been on our furniture businesses. We've
  • Dining Guide
  • Chef's Choice: Ryan Barnett

    Ryan Barnett, Fireside red Barnett with Ariana's GnocchiAriana's Gnocchi and peas Since the recent closure of Bistro Corlise, my regular dining spot, I was confused as to where to take my wife for a good dinner. Then I found Ariana and their wonderful gnocchi.

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