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  • Issue of
  • Jan 14-20, 2010
  • Vol. 14, No. 2

News

  • Local News
  • Take This Plan And Shove It: DLCD gives Bend's growth plan a formal rejection

    It's been five plus years in the making and it's apparently going to be at least a few more months - if not years - before the proposed urban growth boundary expansion in Bend is finalized. The city got the formal rejection letter earlier this week from state land use regulators at the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) whose staff had long voiced skepticism about the scope of Bend's proposed urban expansion. In its 156-page rejection letter, or 'remand' in planning speak, DLCD said that while an expansion of Bend's urban area is merited given the growth patterns (another 40,000 residents are expected in the city over the next 20 years) the current proposal from city staff is simply too big - four square miles too big by DLCD's calculations. In addition to the city's proposed land expansion, DLCD staff also sent the city back to the drawing board for its accompanying facilities plan.
  • Behind the Lens: Local teen filmmakers tackle C-SPAN's StudentCam Documentary Contest
  • Local News
  • Behind the Lens: Local teen filmmakers tackle C-SPAN's StudentCam Documentary Contest

    "It's the biggest amount of joblessness anyone's ever seen and it's affecting a lot of people and businesses. Also, Bend is one of the worst towns when it comes to the economy." Such sentiments have been tossed around in conversation for a couple years now, but it might come as a surprise to learn that these are the words of a 15-year-old Bend High freshman. Her name is Beth Miller and she is one of the eight middle and high school students gathered at the downtown Bend Boys and Girls Club to begin work on a video project sponsored by C-SPAN.
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Opinion

  • Another Bank Heist: Reid vs. Obama, China vs. Detroit, and Mick vs. Capitalism
  • Editorial
  • Another Bank Heist: Reid vs. Obama, China vs. Detroit, and Mick vs. Capitalism

    The author has been sent on the road to discover a lost country formerly known as America. He is reporting from "Avatar" - a futuristic and fabulous world with no plot and subpar acting but, hey, it looks great - on assignment for Or-Bust.com and The Source Weekly. Whachusay? Cracker Harry Reid, Senate Majority Leader, said that mayonnaise-loving Americans were ready for someone "light-skinned" speaking to them with "no Negro dialect" during the Presidential race in 2008. Retroactively reported by fellow SPF 95-users Mark Halperin and John Heilemann in their book "Game Change" this non-news is being touted by minority-loving Republicans (with African-American GOP Chairman Michael Steele the face of the attack, of course) to make Reid step down and Obama to at last admit he was kidnapped while doing community service work in Chicago and brainwashed by China - A Manchurian Candidate who won not because George W. Bush was an awful president and challengers John "I'm Not Creepy" McCain/Sarah "Huh?" Palin sub-par, but rather, because he's an eloquent, intelligent, and inspirational light-skinned black man.
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Culture

  • Darwin At COCC
  • Culture Features
  • Darwin At COCC

    As a professional biologist, Jay Bowerman can probably be excused for taking a purely non-political perspective on his latest endeavor, a nearly yearlong series of lectures on Charles Darwin and his landmark work on natural selection and the accompanying theory of evolution. A former president and executive director at the Sunriver Nature Center and Observatory, Bowerman has long been fascinated by the lasting impact of Darwin's theories and the evolving scientific framework, which Bowerman calls "an incredible unifying theory for all the life sciences." Not unlike the theory of relativity in physics, just about every process in the natural sciences can be traced back to Darwin's pioneering theories.
  • Past the Coolers, Up the Stairs: Tew Boots Gallery takes art to the second level
  • Art Watch
  • Past the Coolers, Up the Stairs: Tew Boots Gallery takes art to the second level

    Through the Bond Street Market's door, past the buzzing coolers and the bottles of beer and soda they dutifully keep cool, there's a hairpin turn that leads up a staircase lined on one side by a row of ascending paintings, some featuring the increasingly recognizable iconography of emerging Bend artist Alex Reisfar. At the top of the stairs on most days, or at least afternoons and evenings, you'll find Annie Shininger and her Tew Boots Gallery. On an inversion-dampened afternoon, Shininger is in her second-level gallery looking over the current works on display through her distinctively vintage cat-eyed glasses. My Morning Jacket's "One Big Holiday" emanates from speakers on Shininger's desk, bouncing off the art-covered walls of the cozy albeit small space, as she takes a second to reflect on the current state of Bend's art scene.
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Food & Drink

  • Old School: Kayo's new dinner house plans and Oxford's 10 Below
  • Chow
  • Old School: Kayo's new dinner house plans and Oxford's 10 Below

    10 Below and the Oxford Hotel are set to officially open this week. Located in the lower lobby of the hotel, 10 Below gets its name from the hotel's street address (10 NW Minnesota). The menu ($8-25), by Chef Sam Reed, formerly of Sunriver Resort and The Biltmore in Arizona, is sure to please. Local Bendite Todd Lambert joins Reed as Sous Chef at what is likely to be a new hotspot in Bend. The bar features a high-end selection of liquors. The décor alone is worth the trip. Shiny, white antler looking light fixtures adorn the ceiling; a colorful wall of woven lights blurs the line between function and art; sculptural tree stumps, saplings, and cross-sections pay tribute to the eco-friendly, environmentally-conscious tagline of the Oxford Hotel.
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  • Old School: Kayo's new dinner house plans and Oxford's 10 Below
  • Chow
  • Old School: Kayo's new dinner house plans and Oxford's 10 Below

    10 Below and the Oxford Hotel are set to officially open this week. Located in the lower lobby of the hotel, 10 Below gets its name from the hotel's street address (10 NW Minnesota). The menu ($8-25), by Chef Sam Reed, formerly of Sunriver Resort and The Biltmore in Arizona, is sure to please. Local Bendite Todd Lambert joins Reed as Sous Chef at what is likely to be a new hotspot in Bend. The bar features a high-end selection of liquors. The décor alone is worth the trip. Shiny, white antler looking light fixtures adorn the ceiling; a colorful wall of woven lights blurs the line between function and art; sculptural tree stumps, saplings, and cross-sections pay tribute to the eco-friendly, environmentally-conscious tagline of the Oxford Hotel.
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  • Little Bites: Old School: Kayo's new dinner house plans and Oxford's 10 Below
  • Chow
  • Little Bites: Old School: Kayo's new dinner house plans and Oxford's 10 Below

    10 Below and the Oxford Hotel are set to officially open this week. Located in the lower lobby of the hotel, 10 Below gets its name from the hotel's street address (10 NW Minnesota). The menu ($8-25), by Chef Sam Reed, formerly of Sunriver Resort and The Biltmore in Arizona, is sure to please. Local Bendite Todd Lambert joins Reed as Sous Chef at what is likely to be a new hotspot in Bend. The bar features a high-end selection of liquors. The décor alone is worth the trip. Shiny, white antler looking light fixtures adorn the ceiling; a colorful wall of woven lights blurs the line between function and art; sculptural tree stumps, saplings, and cross-sections pay tribute to the eco-friendly, environmentally-conscious tagline of the Oxford Hotel.
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  • The Bend Barrio: Say 'Hello' to Nouveau Peruvian-Mexican food at Hola!
  • Chow
  • The Bend Barrio: Say 'Hello' to Nouveau Peruvian-Mexican food at Hola!

    Since opening in 2007, Hola! has become a mainstay for consistent Latin cuisine. With a menu that features traditional dishes from Peru & Mexico and an extensive tequila bar, Hola! offers authenticity without overkill, relying on fresh, hand-made dishes and a casual, fun dining experience. From tableside guacamole ($9), to shaker-size margarita portions ($7-10), and two convenient locations serving lunch and dinner, say hello to a seasoned restaurant with staying power. Visiting the East Side location for lunch, the intoxicating smells of tortilla chips frying and carne asada roasting took me back to the year I spent in the Barrio of Tucson, Arizona. Back then, I lived beside the oldest Mexican restaurant in town, El Charro, where house specialty carne seca was air dried daily in a cage hanging over the roof. The smell of Mexican comfort food is as much of a feature of life in the Barrio as the sweltering heat, and the smell of Hola! reminded me of Tucson.
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  • The Bend Barrio: Say 'Hello' to Nouveau Peruvian-Mexican food at Hola!
  • Chow
  • The Bend Barrio: Say 'Hello' to Nouveau Peruvian-Mexican food at Hola!

    Since opening in 2007, Hola! has become a mainstay for consistent Latin cuisine. With a menu that features traditional dishes from Peru & Mexico and an extensive tequila bar, Hola! offers authenticity without overkill, relying on fresh, hand-made dishes and a casual, fun dining experience. From tableside guacamole ($9), to shaker-size margarita portions ($7-10), and two convenient locations serving lunch and dinner, say hello to a seasoned restaurant with staying power. Visiting the East Side location for lunch, the intoxicating smells of tortilla chips frying and carne asada roasting took me back to the year I spent in the Barrio of Tucson, Arizona. Back then, I lived beside the oldest Mexican restaurant in town, El Charro, where house specialty carne seca was air dried daily in a cage hanging over the roof. The smell of Mexican comfort food is as much of a feature of life in the Barrio as the sweltering heat, and the smell of Hola! reminded me of Tucson.
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Screen

  • The World is a Stage: The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus wraps a real-life puzzle in a universal enigma
  • Film
  • The World is a Stage: The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus wraps a real-life puzzle in a universal enigma

    Although this movie will be spoken of generally as "the one Heath Ledger was making when he died," the latest work from the director of Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam, is not exactly a Heath Ledger movie. He's hardly in it. And while it's natural to eagerly await the scenes in which he appears - as attractive and talented as he was - to do so while watching The Imaginarium Of Dr Parnassus would be a waste. If you want some pure, unadulterated Heath Ledger, watch Brokeback Mountain or I'm Not There. Equally, do not expect to see much of the three actors who stepped in for Ledger: Johnny Depp, Colin Farrell and Jude Law, as their scenes amount to about 20 minutes. Instead, go see this one because it's made by an interesting writer-director whose mix of substance and style is consistently daring and thought provoking.
  • All that Blood and Nowhere to Go: Disappointing plot ruins the gory light in Daybreakers
  • Film
  • All that Blood and Nowhere to Go: Disappointing plot ruins the gory light in Daybreakers

    Beginning with ultra-cool shots and dreamlike photography, Daybreakers shows promise, but with all of its flourishing potential (and tons of blood and gore) it starts to fall apart midway and never recovers. The Spierig Brothers directed The Undead, a fairly unknown and underrated Australian zombies-from-space flick, but this time the pair of sibling directors traded in zombies for vampires and daytime for night. Daybeakers is an apocalyptic vision wherein vampires rule the world that proves strong in some parts and disappointingly bad in others. Thanks to a viral epidemic a decade ago, most of the world's population has turned into vampires (the non-sparkly, non-sexy sort of vampires), and a huge corporation oversees a sterile, clinical slaughterhouse that creates the world's blood supply. A brute-force vampire military hunts and herds humans like cattle, but still the blood supply is dwindling. Ethical vampire chemist Edward (Ethan Hawke) is attempting to find a blood substitute but it's not that easy. Without human blood, vampires are starving to death, their physical deterioration resembling bat-winged meth-heads. The covert underground consists of a few straggling human survivors wielding cross bows and shotguns.

Music

  • Recordings you need to hear but may have missed: Otis Redding - The Soul Album
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Recordings you need to hear but may have missed: Otis Redding - The Soul Album

    Otis Redding The Soul Album Released 1966 What a feat. In his short 26 years of life, Otis Redding left behind a bunch of studio albums and some of the greatest passion and desperation packed soul recordings. Otis is most known for his pop songs, but The Soul Album offers varying textures and styles that far surpass his other recordings. From horns that pull you in to soulful vocals that demand your attention and compassion, this recording has it all.
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  • Teaching the Punks to Dance: The Redwood Plan, with a lively attorney at the helm, bring dance-punk down from Seattle
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Teaching the Punks to Dance: The Redwood Plan, with a lively attorney at the helm, bring dance-punk down from Seattle

    Lesli Wood, her short, asymmetrical hairstyle streaked with fire engine red, is rarely still on stage. She claps, she jumps and, now, with her new band, The Redwood Plan, she dances. After a decade spent at the helm of Seattle punk act Ms. Led, Wood is now wrapping up her first year with The Redwood Plan, the dance-rock quartet she formed with several other mainstays of the Seattle's rock scene. Her crowds have traded mosh pits for hip-shaking, but the Lesli Wood that earned a reputation as the political rabble-rousing lead singer of Ms. Led still rocks. She still rocks, that is, when she's on tour, like she'll be this week when she comes to Bend's Players Bar and Grill on Friday, but during most days, Wood, like so many of us, is behind a desk. You see, though her mostly black clothes and aforementioned distinct haircut might not suggest it, Wood is an attorney and has been for the past five years.

Outside

  • Look Out Below!: Grebes are falling out of the sky
  • Natural World
  • Look Out Below!: Grebes are falling out of the sky

    This has been the year for grebes to fall out of the sky, literally. Three weeks ago, a Western grebe was discovered standing in the middle of Bradley Road east of Sisters in the early morning hours by Spirit of Sisters storeowner Sue Purcell. Sue had no idea what the bird was, where it had come from or why it was sitting in the middle of the road. But she did the right thing and checked to be sure she wasn't going to be run over by a 10-wheeler, carefully wrapped the bird in a blanket, placed it in a cardboard box and called me. The western grebe, aechmophorus occidentalis, is a water bird that eats fish of all kinds, and is so adapted to paddling on and under water that their legs have moved so far aft they and their kin have evolved into swimmers, not walkers. Western grebes are black-and-white, especially in breeding plumage, with a long, slender, swan-like neck and brilliant red eyes. In the early 1900s when bird's feathers were big in women's fashion, grebes were slaughtered by the "plume-hunters" who took only a patch of skin and breast feathers and sold it as "Oregon Sable."

Blogs

  • Off Piste
  • Five Ring Circus: Let the Games Begin

    While the big news at NBC Television is the squabble over the Tonight Show time slot between Conan O'Brien and Jay Leno, there's another story at the network that's equally interesting to some. It's the story of how NBC is taking a bath (to the tune of $200 million) on advertising for the upcoming Winter Olympics is Vancouver.
  • The Beacon
  • Former Chamber Chief To Run For City Council

      If you don’t know Mike Schmidt, it’s worth pointing out that whatever assumptions that you might have about his former career as a “chamber guy” are probably off the mark. In fact it’s probably more telling that Schmidt is no longer with the Bend Chamber than the fact that he was –since he’s spent a good deal of his post-Bend Chamber career working on behalf of causes that the chamber has either actively opposed (a local business tax) or at least remained totally ambivalent about (Bend Transit and disabled access).
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Let's Dig Our Way Out of This Hole

    The City of Bend is talking about creating a no-destination-resort buffer zone around the city, and the Central Oregon Association of Realtors doesn’t like that idea one bit. Deschutes County is reviewing and revising its rules for where destination resorts can go, and city staff wants to prohibit them within five miles of the city’s Urban Growth Boundary.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • This Is Getting Embarrassing

    The anti-Measure 67 forces continue to have a real problem finding a bona fide small business in Oregon that actually would be hurt by it. In early December they mass-mailed a “personal letter” from Tillamook dairy owner Carol Marie Leuthold expressing fear that M67 would “hurt our farm and the families it supports.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Chris Telfer's Magical Pot o' Gold

    State Sen. Chris Telfer (R-Bend) continues to insist there are hidden billions that the state could tap into to erase its budget deficit without a tax increase - even though the state Department of Administrative Services says, in effect, that she's full of it.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • The Journal's Fuzzy Numbers

    The Wall Street Journal published an editorial against Measures 66 and 67 that’s been widely circulated via e-mail and quoted approvingly on conservative websites such as The Oregon Catalyst.  But Oregonian blogger Jeff Mapes caught the Journal with its factual pants down.

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