The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon | Issue Archives | Feb 4, 2010
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  • Issue of
  • Feb 4-10, 2010
  • Vol. 14, No. 5

News

  • Local News
  • A Pet Problem: A Bend couple turn their dog's injuries into a chance for change

    Zoe was the runt of the litter. Of the 10 collies she was born alongside in Southern California, she was the smallest, often fighting with her siblings for food and was the last puppy of the brood to leave the breeder. It was John and Caren Burton who took Zoe into their home just east of Bend. Zoe took to her new owners and her new high-desert terrain, gradually shaking off the timidity of her infancy and, like so many pet animals, became a member of the family. John and Caren went as far as to bestow upon her a middle name: Autumn, reflecting the hue of her coat, which John referred to as "the color of fall golden wheat." She would often accompany the Burtons on their trips, riding in the car without complaint, and in her six years Zoe had only been left in another's care a handful of times.

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • Ripped From The Headlines: Torn gets ripped, Obama woodsheds Congress and more!

    The author has been sent on the road to discover a lost country formerly known as America. He is reporting from the Super Bowl (really his couch, a bottle and bookie only a reach away), hating the guy who loves the commercials - on assignment for Or-Bust.com and The Source Weekly. Busted Piggy Banks President Obama is doing more damage control than Toyota. Gas pedals sticking to the floor and sending cars out of control at high speed (stop, think, put the car in neutral, people) is much like government spending. The new $3.6-trillion budget is akin to a panhandler trying to sell a Hummer (err, let's say Porsche) and will increase our deficit by $1.6 trillion over ten years, a reality that the White House defended by pointing out that Obama inherited a $1.3 trillion deficit from Bush. Does any of this make sense? Of course not. We're dealing with D.C. here, where our money and morals are mere talking points. The budget does include cuts: Bush's attempt to explore the moon (so much cheese still undiscovered), border security (shhh, don't tell Mexico), and a bunch of programs that fix the environment and actually help people but are no longer compelling sound-bites on television and YouTube.
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  • Editorial
  • Mayor Daley's Raid on Oregon

    When you're the mayor of a decaying Rust Belt city, you naturally are inclined to grasp at any straw of hope that seems to present itself, so we probably shouldn't be too hard on Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley. His Honor has been bragging loudly about how Oregon's passage of Measures 66 and 67, which modestly increased taxes on affluent individuals and big businesses, is going to prove to be a windfall for America's former Second (now Third) City. "It will help our economic development immediately," Daley told the Chicago Sun-Times. "You'd better believe it. We'll be out in Oregon enticing corporations to relocate to Chicago." Daley couldn't resist throwing in some faux populist, anti-progressive-tax rhetoric: "I've always thought America stands for [rewarding success]. ... I never knew it's a class war - that those who succeed in life are the ones that have to bear all the burden. ... It will be a whole change in America that those who succeed and work hard, we're gonna tax 'em more than anyone else."
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  • Letters to the Editor
  • Oregon's Priorities

    It's no secret that Oregon's prison spending has been spiraling out of control. Now comes the latest evidence that Oregon has its priorities backward at a time when it's slashing spending on education, healthcare and other social safety net programs.
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Culture

  • Picks
  • Our Picks for 2/3 - 2/11: Art Walk, Cash'd Out, Slightly Stoopid and more

    First Friday Art Walkfriday 5After taking January off, the First Friday Art Walk is back on with all the usual suspects (downtown, Old Mill, Northwest Crossing and beyond) showing off local, regional and national artists. Hit our Local Arts listings for a complete gallery guide. Cash'd Out friday 5Tribute bands can sometimes wander into dangerously corny territory, but that doesn't seem to be the case with this San Diego-based Johnny Cash cover band. Their covers of mostly early Cash numbers (including all the classics, of course) are eerily on target - down to the twang of the guitar and the smoothly deep vocals that made Cash an American legend. Larry and His Flask open. $12/door. All ages. 9pm. Domino Room, 51 NW Greenwood Ave.After Hours Art Party friday 6After doing the walk of art (our second favorite walk, behind the walk of life, of course), you can keep your creative appreciation muscles flexed by hitting up the Silver Moon where you'll see live painting from Erik Hoogen and music from Mindscape. $5. 9pm. Silver Moon Brewing Co., 24 NW Greenwood Ave.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • Phoenix Rising: The Phoenix re-opens with a fresh menu and new locale

    To state how The Phoenix rises from the ashes in rejuvenation and rebirth would be obvious, but what isn't so obvious to many in Bend is that The Phoenix Café has reopened as The Phoenix in the old Kayo's Roadhouse location. With the moniker, "A Restaurant for Everyone," The new Phoenix menu sets no boundaries of regional flavor, blending elements of American steakhouse, Thai fusion and California cuisine. With dark, private banquette seating and dim lighting, the space is conducive to intimate dining despite high-volume traffic. The wait staff is attractive and well trained - the sort of people I want to be serving my food. For breakfast, the thought behind the Phoenix Omelette ($8.50) was good; it had mushrooms, spinach, Swiss and sausage ($1.50). The sausage was well seasoned and flavorful, while the eggs and vegetables could have benefited from more seasoning. A little Cholula went a long way. The rosemary roasted potatoes were crunchy on the outside and creamy on the inside.
  • Chow
  • Phoenix Rising: The Phoenix re-opens with a fresh menu and new locale

    To state how The Phoenix rises from the ashes in rejuvenation and rebirth would be obvious, but what isn't so obvious to many in Bend is that The Phoenix Café has reopened as The Phoenix in the old Kayo's Roadhouse location. With the moniker, "A Restaurant for Everyone," The new Phoenix menu sets no boundaries of regional flavor, blending elements of American steakhouse, Thai fusion and California cuisine. With dark, private banquette seating and dim lighting, the space is conducive to intimate dining despite high-volume traffic. The wait staff is attractive and well trained - the sort of people I want to be serving my food. For breakfast, the thought behind the Phoenix Omelette ($8.50) was good; it had mushrooms, spinach, Swiss and sausage ($1.50). The sausage was well seasoned and flavorful, while the eggs and vegetables could have benefited from more seasoning. A little Cholula went a long way. The rosemary roasted potatoes were crunchy on the outside and creamy on the inside.

Screen

  • Film
  • Teetering on the Edge of Salvation: Mel Gibson proves surprisingly entertaining in Edge of Darkness

    Mel Gibson has been hiding behind the camera, producing and directing since starring in 2002's dreadful Signs, perhaps a wise choice since he spent equal time revealing weird religious philosophies and actively shocking us with his crazy off-screen persona. But now Gibson makes his somewhat triumphant return to the screen in Edge of Darkness, yet another Massachusetts-set crime thriller in which we're forced to spend time debating the authenticity of the actors' Boston accents. The good news is this one is not without its merits. As it happens, the film is a remake. Director Martin Campbell upgrades his 1985 British mini-series (which he also directed) in which a straight-laced father, an inspector of the local police force, deals with the mysterious death of his activist daughter, and the murkiness of the British Nuclear Policy.
  • Film Events
  • The Crime Bowl

    I have a deeply rooted psychological problem, and... wait. What do you mean, "No shit, Sherlock"? For all you know, YOU'RE the one with a deeply rooted psychological problem, and I'M the one who's AWESOME... and NORMAL! Now I'll happily admit that my feelings toward the Super Bowl (CBS, Sun Feb 7, 3 pm) run counter to that of most of the nation. Half of you, for example, love the spectacle of steroid-addled meatloafs giving each other concussions and chasing a ball around a field for the opportunity to score a touchdown and feel up each others' asses on the sideline. (Actually, that doesn't sound half bad... but don't interrupt me! I'm on a roll!) The other half don't give two poops about football, and are instead fans of zany and wildly expensive Super Bowl commercials (that are almost as homoerotic as the real life sideline ass grabs - I'm looking at YOU, Snickers!). And because I hate both of those things, I'M THE PSYCHOLOGICALLY CRAZY ONE??
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Keeping the Discussion Open: Some of Bend's biggest bands (and some out-of-towners) team up to send Help to Haiti

    It's been more than three weeks since the devastating earthquake hit Haiti, taking 170,000 lives (and possibly many more) and decimating the infrastructure of the already poverty-stricken island nation. There's been an outpouring of donations and other support from not just the neighboring United States, but also from around the world, to help the country. The stories surrounding the earthquake, most of them heartbreaking, have flooded the media, and the phrase "Text Haiti to 90999... " has become omnipresent. But as time goes by, the news reports will begin to fade. According to Jesse Roberts, founder of the locally based humanitarian non-profit, Rise Up International, Haiti's need for aid will endure.

Outside

  • Natural World
  • There are No Trilobites in Oregon: Well, maybe...

    Now that I've reached that "ripe old age" of over 80, I find myself enjoying fossils more than I did years ago. Do you suppose someone's trying to tell me something? Be that as it may, for more years than I care to remember, I've heard the old axiom, "Some day, someone will find a trilobite in Oregon." Well, maybe. One place to look is in the fossil-bearing Permian limestone of Coyote Butte near the Nevada border in southeast Oregon. "Hold on," you say, "We have a Coyote Butte along China Hat Road, southeast of Bend." Sorry, that's a cinder cone, no trilobites there, it's volcanic in origin and several millions of years to young.
  • Outside Features
  • Roaming the Aisles: A marathon a day, sexy robots and other dispatches

    I sure wish that headline read, "Roaming the Isles" and this column was coming to you from a sea kayak in Fiji or a sailboat in the Bahamas. Instead, I just returned from the aisles of the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida where I make an annual pilgrimage to the Surf Expo Trade Show. As far as trade shows go, fondling boards and hanging out with legends like Shaun Tomson at Surf Expo is probably a helluva a lot more fun than, say, schmoozing with a bunch of morticians at the Casket and Funeral Supply Association of America (CFSAA) Fall Conference & Trade Show held in November in Indianapolis. Or investigating the latest porta-potty technologies at the Portable Sanitation Association International (PSAI) Convention & Trade Show held every year in Daytona Beach. Maybe not quite as exciting though, as checking out Foxy Roxxxy, the world's first sex robot that was unveiled at the AVN Adult Entertainment Expo in Las Vegas last month. The dark-haired, negligee-clad, life-size robot comes complete with flesh-like synthetic skin, artificial intelligence and can converse about football.

Blogs

  • The Beacon
  • Ex-Bend Chamber Pres Drops out of Council Race

    Former Bend Chamber President Mike Schmidt announced today that he is dropping out of this year’s Bend City Council race just a few weeks after announcing his candidacy. Schmidt, who came to Bend from California to replace controversial ex-Chamber President Gary Peters, charted a new more progressive direction for the chamber before splitting ways with the Bend business group.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Dudley Tries to Get in the Tax Game

    Republican Chris Dudley, the former Portland Trail Blazer who wants to be Oregon’s governor, is challenging Chicago Mayor Richard Daley to go one-on-one – but it’s not clear what game he wants to play. Daley has gotten attention over the past week by predicting he’ll be able to lure businesses away from Oregon to Chicago after the passage of Measures 66 and 67.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Lights Out for Colorado Springs

    Four years ago, Money magazine ranked Colorado Springs one of the 10 best places to live in America, and Number One among large cities. Now the joke is that the last person to leave will have to turn out the lights.

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