The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon | Issue Archives | Mar 4, 2010
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  • Issue of
  • Mar 4-10, 2010
  • Vol. 14, No. 9

News

  • Local News
  • Coming Clean: When a losing streak isn't enough to kill a gambling addiction

    Oregonians have their own way of looking at things. There is a spirit of fun and adventure that runs through pretty much everything we do here. And when Oregon was struggling to rebound from a severe recession in the 1980s, Oregonians looked for a way to respond that did more than just make money. The people of Oregon knew it would take some cash to jump-start the economy, but they weren't about to settle for business as usual. They also wanted to offer Oregonians a chance to have some fun! So, on November 6, 1984, Oregonians voted to create a state lottery by a margin of two to one... - It Does Good Things, a webpage created by the Oregon State Lottery I'm a hardcore slot machine junkie. There are no other words to describe my compulsion for my favorite drug. I've been clean for nearly a year. I wouldn't predict a longer run of sobriety for me except for what I can manage today. That's the nature of true addiction. For about 10 years of my 14-year gambling stretch, I gambled in binges - every one to three weeks. Toward the end I became a furious and resentful woman. I hated my beloved town that had become a playground for the rich and fatuous; the once-wild Southwest that was pocked with gated developments and huge fifth wheel RVs - and my friends, for seeming to no longer want to spend much time with me. But more than anything, I hated my species for gobbling up the planet that was my purest medicine. And every one to three weeks, I burned gasoline driving an hour or more to casinos in which I could forget the fact that I was in a casino whose existence was gobbling the planet even faster. Only when I was hunkered down at my favorite slot machine did I feel relaxed and normal. That's the nature of this addiction.

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • Crazy For You: The politics of education, unpaid dental bills and the problem with atheists

    The author has been sent on the road to discover a lost country formerly known as America. He is reporting from a failed Socialist state headed by an illegal alien (or maybe listening to too much AM radio) on assignment for Or-Bust.com and The Source Weekly. The Crazies There's something in the water. Or it's an election year... Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY - the state, not the sexy lubricant) is going out in style, retiring after two terms, and using an arcane Senate procedure to block a funding bill for extended jobless and health care benefits, infrastructure projects and other liberal Socialist programs. Immediately laying off 2,000 workers, cutting COBRA health coverage, and ensuring that 400,000 unemployed Americans starve, Bunning is doing so out of concern that the Dem majority hasn't shown a way to offset the $10 billion cost, offering, "I hope the American people understand my serious objections." Of course, by the time you read this, Bunning's feat will be forgotten (much like when he pitched a perfect game in 1964 for the Phillies); much like Senator Richard Shelby's (R-AL) blanket blocking of Obama's 70-plus presidential appointments, all because he wants more earmarks for Alabama. One Republican wants to control spending and another wants more money, you gotta love the Grand Ole Party. What's next?
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  • Editorial
  • John Day 1, Nazis 0

    John Day is a pretty little Eastern Oregon town that up until last month was known mostly for the good fishing in the John Day River and good fossil-hunting in the nearby John Day Fossil Beds. But in mid-February, a group that embraces fossilized political and racial ideas cast an unwelcome spotlight on John Day. Paul R. Mullet, who calls himself the national director of the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations group, breezed into town in a swastika-bedecked shirt and let it be known that he was looking at some real estate. The group is planning to relocate from northern Idaho, he said, and John Day looks like the perfect place to establish its new headquarters. Aryan Nations is a virulently racist white supremacist organization founded in the 1970s and originally headquartered in northern Idaho. It's anti-black, anti-Semitic and anti-Hispanic, and dreams of creating a "Fourth Reich," a whites-only "Aryan" nation within the United States.
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  • Letters to the Editor
  • This week's number: $16 Million

    The amount of money that the City of Bend is seeking in earmarks from the federal government. Chided in the past for not seeking government handouts, the city is asking Oregon's congressional delegation to help the city fund federally mandated upgrades to its drinking water system and its sidewalks, many of which have been found to be inadequate under the American's with Disabilities.
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  • Letters to the Editor
  • She's No Superwoman!

    My first thought was that, from the single mother mired in a Central Oregon recession to oncologist Dr. Linyee Chang, or one of the physicians at Fall Creek Medicine, from COCC's Rebecca Walker-Sands and Kathleen McCabe to Rachael Scdoris, all these candidates, all you can come up with is a bored housewi.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • No Trivial Matter

    I am writing this letter to concur with The Source's letter complaining about the Trivia Bee competition held February 20th and its procedural, factual and typographical faults. In my opinion, it was actually worse than that. I have played in various trivia competitions for 35 years, and I left the Trivia Bee that night more frustrated and angered than I have ever been at similar games. Not only do I take exception with the poor question writing, but in my heart-of-hearts feel that with all the missteps I have seen at the last two Trivia Bees the event seems [untrustworthy].
  • Letters to the Editor
  • A Magnet For Problems

    There is a problem with traffic around Kenwood/Highland school every weekday mornings and afternoon. It is dangerous for the kids and dangerous for the neighborhood. The school district and the city have been working on a possible solution for a number of years. They currently are considering back-in angled parking on Harmon from Newport Avenue to Nashville, to accommodate approximately 13 to 15 parking spaces for parents dropping their kids off at school. This project is going to cost the school district and the city around $150,000. The problem solely exists because Kenwood/Highland is a magnet school. There is no bussing for magnet schools. Many of the students live far away from the schools and are driven to school by their parents. When Kenwood was a regular neighborhood school, the problem didn't exist. I know because I've lived on the corner of Harmon and Nashville for over 30 years. The kids walked, rode their bikes, or came via bus.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Is Wilderness Good Business?

    I was on site when President John F. Kennedy declared the North Fork of the John Day a wilderness. The way we used the new wilderness changed. There were no more mountain bikes, no more game carts or retrieving game with a Jeep. That is all part of life and we have made adjustments and enjoy the wilderness experience. However, over the years the wilderness has become more crowded and, yes, it has been good for business. The more people that have access to and enjoy wilderness areas definitely create a draw and economic stimulus. I have followed the process by which the newly proposed Cathedral Rock and Horse Heaven wilderness areas have been fast tracked and I am concerned. First there is a land exchange to consolidate private and public lands. This is a good concept. As a river drifter I have had access to the river through Cathedral Rock area as long as the river has adequate water - four to five months a year. It has been stated that this wilderness will protect endangered plant species and that it will open access to more public land. This is where the burr under my saddle begins to rub.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Ain't No Party Like A Tea Pary

    In response to Dana Johnson's claim that the Tea Party has the answers for the ills of this country. First, this so-called Tea Party movement has absolutely nothing in common and nothing to do with the Boston Tea Party of 1773.

Culture

  • Culture Features
  • Cards, Booze, Working Girls and Spittoons: The High Desert Museum brings the wildness of the West to life with Sin in the Sagebrush

    The peculiar and markedly simple card game of faro might actually be spelled "pharaoh," but there's no point in debating the spelling because hardly anyone has played the game in the last century. But down at the High Desert Museum, faro is being played, the antiquated cards dealt onto a century-old table by a young man dressed in a vest, dress shirt and a bowler hat. He's dressed like it's 1900, which is exactly the time period the High Desert Museum is trying to create with its Sin in the Sagebrush exhibit, a meticulously crafted, time-period-accurate look into the gambling, drinking, whoring, fighting, dancing, shooting and other displays of general debauchery that accompanied life in the often harsh Western frontier. The exhibit, running through September before hitting the road to other museums around the country, has been some three years in the making, as curator Bob Boyd and his team gathered genuine articles from this era like, for example, an array of gamblers' cheating devices, including a strap that allowed card players to literally keep an ace up their sleeves.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • Little Bites: Pizza, Pizza: New pies from 10 Barrel and Versante

    After breezing through 10 Barrel Brewing's soft opening last week, Quick Bites got a closer look at the new pub's operation this week. Owners Chris Cox and Garrett Wales said business has been brisk for the newest member of Bend's brewpub family. We returned this week to look over the pub's menu, which features many of the brewpub industry standards like mac and cheese, burgers and salads. However, the pub is also offering a strong line up of pizzas ranging from a plain mozzarella and herb pie ($12/large) to an elaborate prosciutto pesto chicken pizza ($18/large). Other interesting menu items include tempura-fried steak fingers ($8) and steamed manila clams served in 10 Barrel's American Wheat Ale broth.
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  • Chow
  • Pizza, Pizza: New pies from 10 Barrel and Versante

    After breezing through 10 Barrel Brewing's soft opening last week, Quick Bites got a closer look at the new pub's operation this week. Owners Chris Cox and Garrett Wales said business has been brisk for the newest member of Bend's brewpub family. We returned this week to look over the pub's menu, which features many of the brewpub industry standards like mac and cheese, burgers and salads. However, the pub is also offering a strong line up of pizzas ranging from a plain mozzarella and herb pie ($12/large) to an elaborate prosciutto pesto chicken pizza ($18/large). Other interesting menu items include tempura-fried steak fingers ($8) and steamed manila clams served in 10 Barrel's American Wheat Ale broth.
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  • Chow
  • In the McCrystals We Trust: In search of the perfect meal at Jen's Garden

    It's not always glamorous being a food writer. Dining out on a stipend and describing the food, ambience, a restaurant's pedigree, has its challenges. But one of the hardest parts about food writing is relativity. If you're trying to fill a Mexican fast-casual niche, you can't be compared to El Bulli, the best restaurant in the world. If you're a corporate giant set to take over the North end of Bend, you won't be compared to a locally owned restaurant in Sisters, one of the finest in Oregon, Jen's Garden. Jennifer and T.R. McCrystal, recently anointed citizens of the year in Sisters, have been sculpting the art of fine dining in Central Oregon. Upon entering Jen's Garden, a charming house turned restaurant with low ceilings, intimate tables and a local feel, my date and I took a seat in the small room just off the main dining room.
  • Chow
  • In the McCrystals We Trust: In search of the perfect meal at Jen's Garden

    It's not always glamorous being a food writer. Dining out on a stipend and describing the food, ambience, a restaurant's pedigree, has its challenges. But one of the hardest parts about food writing is relativity. If you're trying to fill a Mexican fast-casual niche, you can't be compared to El Bulli, the best restaurant in the world. If you're a corporate giant set to take over the North end of Bend, you won't be compared to a locally owned restaurant in Sisters, one of the finest in Oregon, Jen's Garden. Jennifer and T.R. McCrystal, recently anointed citizens of the year in Sisters, have been sculpting the art of fine dining in Central Oregon. Upon entering Jen's Garden, a charming house turned restaurant with low ceilings, intimate tables and a local feel, my date and I took a seat in the small room just off the main dining room.

Screen

  • Film
  • What's Avatar? Our defiant Oscar picks

    Our two film columnists, Morgan P. Salvo and Holly Grigg-Spall, spent the year liking and hating films, and thinking others were merely OK. Here's who they think should win Oscars this weekend, even when they know their pick won't necessarily take home a little golden man - because James Cameron probably already has it down his pants. Best Picture Holly Grigg-Spall: An Education. For this weekend it almost seems easier to say which films I absolutely don't want to win - Avatar, Up In The Air, District 9 - and it's definitely easier to say which film I think is the best of the lot: An Education. Morgan P. Salvo: A Serious Man. No way in hell it will win but it was the best movie I had the pleasure to view all year. Hurt Locker and District 9 were my runner-ups.
  • Film
  • Whacked Out: The Crazies has its moments with remake of bio terrorism creep fest

    The Crazies is based on the 1973 George A. Romero flick of the same name and joins the ranks of newly remade apocalyptic scenarios, though this 2010 version borrows only marginally from the original. While Crazies '73 was set in Pennsylvania, this time the plot revolves around the inhabitants of Ogden Marsh, a small Iowa town suddenly plagued by an outbreak of insanity and death after a mysterious toxin contaminates their water supply. From the opening scene of a disheveled guy interrupting a kids' softball game carrying a shotgun, Sherriff Dutton (Timothy Olyphant) and Deputy Clank (Joe Anderson) figure something is wrong in their little community. Bouts of insanity are eventually traced to the town's water supply where a plane has mysteriously crashed. Afterward the military moves in, dispensing martial law and wiping Ogden Marsh off the map along with all its inhabitants, infected or not. Where the 1973 classic was more politically motivated, dead set on making parallels to the Vietnam War, the Kent State shootings, this Crazies is more personal, focusing on Sheriff Dutton and his wife/ town doctor (Radha Mitchell) as they battle the evil gas-mask-wearing military on one side and vein-popping wide-eyed crazies on the other.
  • Film Events
  • I Dislike You, Sandra Bullock!

    I'm boycotting the Oscars, guys! I know, I know: "Whatever will the Oscars do if Humpy doesn't watch them this year? They'll be ruined!" Nevertheless, I feel like someone needs to make a stand against the Sandra Bullocks of the world. As you may have heard, Sandra Bullock has been nominated for a Best Actress Award for her role in The Blind Side, in which she plays a rich honky who adopts a black kid who eventually turns out to be a successful football player. Rich honkies, whatever would black people do without you?? THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU!!!
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • All Together Now: Joe Bonamassa

    The name has been bouncing around the media consciousness of Bend for the last month or two. Radio. Websites. Newspapers. But mainly radio - lots of radio, a medium that lends itself well to the baritone pronunciation of a name like Joe Bonamassa, with its vowels and consonants so sexily colliding. And when you combine the uttering of Joe Bonamassa (go ahead, let that last syllable fling sharply off your tongue) with the man behind this name's fiery new-age blues guitar styling and growling voice, the result is pure promotional magic. Again, Joe Bonamassa is a blues rock guitar virtuoso and not a shortstop or a bantam weight fighter like that name of his might suggest.
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  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Change is Good: Why Eric Tollefson can get away with naming his band The World's Greatest Lovers

    When Eric Tollefson released his full-length disc, Sum of Parts, last year, it seemed like the towering redhead had come out of nowhere. There'd been little buzz about him before the release, but soon after he couldn't be avoided, opening shows for Jackie Greene and playing a hard-charging set to warm the stage for G. Love and Special Sauce in early September at the Domino Room. While G. Love was on stage, Tollefson, wearing the Breedlove Guitars baseball cap that seems to be his constant around-town companion, was near the back of the crowd, leaning against the wall. On the Juneau, Alaska, native's face was the sort of grin that comes only from really kicking ass at something, which is what he'd just done - even if he did make the mistake of addressing the blues-guitar playing, hip-hop-rhyme-spouting artist as "G" rather than his preferred "Garrett" when the two met backstage.

Outside

  • Outside Features
  • Time Wounds All Heels: Or ski not gently into that good night

    The sands of time play before my eyes as I type. I see an hourglass, half-full, half-empty, depending on how you look at it. Today is my dog's birthday, and mine too. She's nine years old; I'm 48. Sometimes, getting older can be a good thing- like when you enter a new age group for PPP. But, the grey sprinkling Sprocket's muzzle and the bag of blue ice resting on my shoulder make me only too aware that we are past the out-and-back turnaround and headed toward the finish line. A friend posted this familiar quote on his Facebook wall the other day: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO HOO what a ride!'"

Blogs

  • The Wandering Eye
  • We're Forever Blowing Bubbles

    The front page of the Local section of today’s Bulletin brought more proof (not that any was needed) that the bubble years are over for Central Oregon: Enrollment dropped in all of the region’s school districts over the past year. Bend-LaPine enrollment this school year is down 0.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Putting the People Back in 'We the People'

    When Abe Lincoln talked about “government of the people, by the people and for the people” at the Gettysburg battlefield in November 1863, it’s a pretty safe bet he wasn’t including corporations in his definition of “people.” But in January 2010, a bitterly divided US Supreme Court decided  that corporations have the same free-speech rights as people – meaning they can pour unlimited amounts of money into political campaigns.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • A Rough Welcome for the Professor

    Lewis & Clark Law School professor James Huffman announced his candidacy for Ron Wyden’s US Senate seat yesterday, and the ink wasn’t even dry on his press release before the Democrats pounced on him. The Oregon Democratic Party set up a one-page website titled “Meet Jim Huffman, Right Wing FreedomWorks Ideologue and Candidate for US Senator,” which rips into him for statements he’s made over the years.

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