The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon | Issue Archives | Mar 11, 2010
Search
Username
  • Issue of
  • Mar 11-17, 2010
  • Vol. 14, No. 10

News

  • Local News
  • Sleep, Stretch, Ski: One woman's search for satisfaction in Central Oregon

    I'm no Elizabeth Gilbert, and when my life changed dramatically a few years ago I didn't set off for Italy to eat, India to pray, or Indonesia to find love. I didn't have the money or the resources. My husband died in September 2006 and it took me six months to put one foot in front of the other, to figure out finances, and to adjust to not being a full-time caregiver. It took another year for me to realize that I needed to head for Bend. Twelve years before his death, my husband Ralph had a devastating bicycling accident that left him a C-4 quadriplegic, unable to move his arms or legs, incapable of eating or voiding on his own. One minute he was an amazingly fit athlete training for the California Land Rush, a 400-mile, two-day road bike sprint from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and the next he was flying over the handlebars of his Italian racing bike, about to plunge into a reality neither of us was prepared for.

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • Ben Westlund: A Life Lived Well

    If somebody designed a prototype of the perfect politician, it would be a lot like Ben Westlund. And we mean that as a compliment. Westlund had all the natural gifts that go into making a great politician - an outgoing, gregarious personality, a remarkable memory for names and faces, a ready way with words. But beyond that, there was something else that made him special: He was real. The friendliness, the concern for the problems of other people, the passion for making his state better - all that wasn't just a façade that Westlund erected to impress voters. It was who Ben Westlund was.
  • Editorial
  • How To Defend Big Ben: Grilling Roethlisberger, the insurance racket, soft drink taxes and more!

    The author has been sent on the road to discover a lost country formerly known as America. He is reporting from D.C., marrying his new pal Gary for a goof, on assignment for Or-Bust.com and The Source Weekly. Kettle said "Say What?" to the Pot "The reconciliation rules have never been used... " repeated Orin Hatch (R-Utah) over and over on Meet the Press, proving the GOP is more redundant than Lil Wayne (who is now serving a one-year sabbatical at Rikers Island on gun charges) "The reconciliation rules have never... " Really? Do any parents remember the S-CHIP bill that brought health care to uncovered children? That's just one evil example of legislation passed by Obama and Dems in that underhanded manner, via reconciliation... How about Bush's tax cuts for the wealthy, adding $1.7 trillion to our debt? Yep, holier than thou Republicans have used reconciliation for only good, right? Reconciliation is a ruse so Republicans can object to the process rather than a health care bill that has most of their wants included - too bad Dems (who called reconciliation "the nuclear option" under Bush) are wimps trying to help the sick and needy, while the GOP (which calls Obama a racist Mexican woman) cares only about fiscal responsibility and freedom, err, corporate donors and regaining power.
  • Tags: ,
  • Editorial
  • Two Slippers are Better Than One

    Two weeks ago, in a fit of irony overload, we gave Chris Telfer a mock glass slipper instead of the real one that we reserve for those folks in the community who continue to unravel the mess that former OLCC Regional Manager Jason Evers left in his wake. Initially disappointed by Telfer's seeming lack of accomplishment this legislative period, we overlooked that her willingness to meet with licensees helped to form the collective basis and network of trust that aided in the DOJ investigation that removed Evers.
  • Tags: ,
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Studs Are Just Duds

    Well I did it! Took my friend Joe's advice and got a set of studded tires. I thought he should know being an ex-highway patrol how safe they would be. Could hardly wait till the snow would fly. Finally it snowed and out I went to try my new tires. The snow was fluffy and deep, about six inches, and sure enough those studs really held. I went right through that soft stuff like anything. Not needing to travel till a few days later when the snow was packed down, out I went, and sure enough those studs really held again. Although when I looked at the pattern in the snow on the street outside my house I could see that the studs were just digging out a divot and not really getting a grip at all. Oh well, those studs really work because I had no trouble on that surface.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Rate Increase Doesn't Add Up

    I didn't know whether to laugh or cry when I read about Pacific Power's proposed 20-percent rate hike. Cry because that's a heck of an increase for a lot of people already struggling with bills, and laugh because they will probably pull it off. Rebuilding a company's infrastructure by buying new equipment, for example, is usually transparent to a customer in any competitive business. Upgrades are performed to meet increasing customer demands (and revenues) and to find ways to reduce costs (since volume usually means lower cost). More times than not the result is a reduction, not an increase, in customer prices. According to Pacific Power, the 20 percent increase equals $470 million that Oregon customers will have to cover for investments (wind farm, coal cleaners, and transmission towers). I'm guessing that a large part of that is for the wind farm (which includes the transmission towers) and I'm guessing that this new source of electricity is being considered because of additional demand, or to cut electricity generation costs. (Wind is far cheaper than nuclear and probably cheaper than hydroelectric).

Culture

  • Culture Features
  • Off the Wall, On the Street: The delightfully low-brow art of Dana MacKenzie

    Sitting on a couch at the Bendistillery Martini Bar, Dana MacKenzie sips from a Rogue Dead Guy Ale as he points up at his artwork on an adjacent wall. He's giving a deeply detailed account of his two pieces and revealing some of the inspiration behind the work he placed on the wall just a few minutes prior. He points out that even 15 years ago, his work might not have even been considered art and that's because the two pieces on the wall are in the form of skateboard decks. The 39-year-old MacKenzie is a graphic artist and made a name for himself early in the history of computer-aided design. Now, MacKenzie lends his skills to the creation of video games, an industry he's been in since the mid-'90s.
  • Picks
  • Our Picks for 3/10 - 3/18: Tuck and Roll, Pato Banton, Local Flavor, Maceo Parker, Brandi Carlile and more

    Tuck and Roll CD Release Party friday 12 Over the last year we've watched as Tuck and Roll got tighter and tighter with their local shows and now they've got a full-length album, Time To Run, to showcase their delicious punk rock licks and NOFX-style harmonies. While poppy punk is the crux of the disc, there's also one Americana-ish gem that caught our ear, that being "Nothing on You." But seriously, go to this show and get this incredibly honed-in record. Danger Death Ray open. $2. 9pm. Players Bar & Grill, 25 SW Century Dr.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • Food On The Go

    Spork, the restaurant with no home but lots of homeys and the coolest graphic design support of any Bend eatery, is back on Century Drive this week serving up its brand of eclectic and savory meals from the Skjersaas parking lot. Catch breakfast lunch or dinner at the Airstream enclosed kitchen between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday this week. And with more warm weather on tap for the end of the week and weekend, look for some of the other mobile food purveyors, including Soupcon Bend and Sancho at the once again bustling corner of Harriman and Greenwood outside the Blacksmith, to begin ramping up business as Spring Fever takes hold. Or if a frankfurter and Old World recipe handmade kraut is more your speed, you'll likely find the BurlyWurst brothers down at Mirror Pond plaza this week, as well.
  • Tags: ,
  • Chow
  • Little Bites: Food On The Go

    Spork, the restaurant with no home but lots of homeys and the coolest graphic design support of any Bend eatery, is back on Century Drive this week serving up its brand of eclectic and savory meals from the Skjersaas parking lot. Catch breakfast lunch or dinner at the Airstream enclosed kitchen between 8 a.
  • Tags: , ,
  • Chow
  • Generous Portions and Good Fortunes: Getting into bed with Red Dragon

    As teenagers, my friends and I became known by name at the Chinese Buffet in our upstate New York town. There, we followed a ritualistic fortune cookie reading in which we'd tack on "in bed" to the end of our fortunes, making each experience a memorable one, and the buffet rotation felt almost like a school cafeteria. Whether it was the sleep-inducing buzz from MSG or our raging teenage hormones that led to the tagline, a reprise of "in bed," fortunes echoed at Red Dragon Chinese Restaurant this week. For many foodies, Americanized Chinese food isn't a regular stop with more authentic Asian options like Japanese and Thai food available, but several of my friends, devout fast-foodies, as I've come to call them, enjoy nothing more than heaping portions of General Tso's (an American invention) at Red Dragon. We arrived at this south-end spot and settled in with good intentions and were greeted by a giant gold Buddha in the entryway and the familiar sounds of trickling water and soft music. The space was well lit and decorated with porcelain vases.
  • Chow
  • Generous Portions and Good Fortunes: Getting into bed with Red Dragon

    As teenagers, my friends and I became known by name at the Chinese Buffet in our upstate New York town. There, we followed a ritualistic fortune cookie reading in which we'd tack on "in bed" to the end of our fortunes, making each experience a memorable one, and the buffet rotation felt almost like a school cafeteria. Whether it was the sleep-inducing buzz from MSG or our raging teenage hormones that led to the tagline, a reprise of "in bed," fortunes echoed at Red Dragon Chinese Restaurant this week. For many foodies, Americanized Chinese food isn't a regular stop with more authentic Asian options like Japanese and Thai food available, but several of my friends, devout fast-foodies, as I've come to call them, enjoy nothing more than heaping portions of General Tso's (an American invention) at Red Dragon. We arrived at this south-end spot and settled in with good intentions and were greeted by a giant gold Buddha in the entryway and the familiar sounds of trickling water and soft music. The space was well lit and decorated with porcelain vases.

Screen

  • Film
  • Down the Garbage Hole: Tim Burton brings us a most un-wonderful Alice In Wonderland

    Tim Burton's Alice In Wonderland is a film so half-assed, so slap-dash, so unbearably boring that I can't even care enough to fully concentrate on writing this review. I am distracting myself with the Oscars - and finding even the interpretative dance sequence to the soundtrack of The Hurt Locker miles more entertaining than the tepid trash Burton is peddling as an adaptation of Lewis Carroll's fascinating classic. The self-consciously wacky director takes a tale brimming with images, historical and cultural references, poems, songs and extraordinary invention, reduces it to a handful of glib catchphrases, then repeats these ad nauseam - while constantly informing us of what has happened, what will happen and what is happening in the style of one of those reality TV shows desperately low on interesting content. Think of all the bits you love from the book, or the Disney cartoon even; well you won't find them here - Burton instead sees fit to strike out the original story and replace it with a CliffsNotes sequel.
  • Film
  • The Righter and the Wronger: Flying bullets dispense final justice in Brooklyn's Finest

    Going into Brooklyn's Finest I didn't expect something special, but I came out somewhat amazed at how bland it really was. It's a lame attempt at combining Training Day and Crash that comes off like a mediocre television crime drama. Finest begins with an ominous black car silhouetted in front of a New York cityscape, as Vincent D'Onofrio delivers a foreboding monologue about what's "righter and wronger" in the fight between cops and lawbreakers. We lose his character quickly, but then a trio of stories begins. We get Dugan (Richard Gere), a drunken suicidal "doesn't-give-a-shit" loser cop with seven days left before retirement and Sal (Ethan Hawke), a Catholic-guilt-ridden, crooked, sociopathic narcotics cop ready to kill and swindle money for the good of his pregnant wife and growing family. Then there's Tango (Don Cheadle), a conflicted undercover cop deep into the drug scene, dealing with the dilemma of busting his long-lost pal Caz (Wesley Snipes) who once saved his life. Tango and Caz... get it? Other stereotypical characters are Will Patton as the grizzled nice guy detective and Ellen Barkin, resembling a cornered bulldog, doing her tough-mama-agent routine.
  • Film Events
  • Who'll Stop The Rain?: Cinematic presentation drowns Heavy Rain

    I knew Heavy Rain was going to be an artsy game as soon as it instructed me to take a piece of paper and fold it into an origami bird. Shortly thereafter I got to see a man's naked ass. By the time the game's female shower scene happened - with the camera swirling around the girl's breasts in intoxicated filmschool closeup - Heavy Rain had sunk so far into pretentious territory that I could tell without looking it had been made by the French.
  • Tags: ,
  • Film Events
  • This Means War!

    Now hold on just a second there, Mr. Tom Brokaw (noted former anchorman and author of the best-selling book The Greatest Generation)! If you ask me, I think it's bullpoopy of you to single-handedly decide that the people who fought in World War II are going to be forever known as "the greatest generation." I mean, C'MON. My generation is pretty awesome, too! After all, we're the generation that invented Internet porn. And the Transformers. And decent marijuana. In case you didn't know, the so-called "greatest generation's" dope SUCKED. (Don't believe me? Ask my grandpa and his cataracts!)
  • Tags: ,

Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • The Funky Old and the Funky New: Maceo Parker and Trombone Shorty blow their horns across the entire region

    On Tuesday night, two men will be blowing their horns here in Central Oregon and both will be getting terribly funky. One specializes in the saxophone while the other favors the trombone but their styles both weave through the realms of jazz, soul and, again, the funkiest of funk. There are plenty of other similarities to be found between these two men and their dance-happy sounds, but where they diverge is the 43-year age gap between them. The man on the saxophone is Maceo Parker, one of the forefathers of funk music, and the other is Trombone Shorty (real name: Troy Andrews) the 24-year-old New Orleans virtuoso who has already generated a mystique of his own, having burst onto the scene as a youth on his namesake instrument.
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Quasi - American Gong

    Quasi American Gong Kill Rock Stars Records All along - when Janet Weiss and Sam Coomes weren't busying themselves with Heatmiser and Sleater-Kinney and the Jicks, or being married and then being divorced - they were Quasi. So when they do occasionally choose to wear their Quasi pants, fans freak. On American Gong, Quasi's eighth record, the band (now a trio) offers more of what makes people love them: out of nowhere jams, lullaby-choruses, sing-song rhymes and dissonant juxtapositions. In fact, it's a bit of a show-off record - not hoity-toity, but a portfolio, almost, of everything they're capable of. "Bye Bye Blackbird" starts as a contagious, loud-quiet-loud rock song, before shuffling off into an all-out jam session.

Outside

  • Natural World
  • Predator and Prey: The plight of the salamander

    A few years back, I had the pleasure of attending the annual meeting of the Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society. Among the papers presented was one titled "The Effects of Stream Crossing Culverts on the Movements of Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus)." Essentially, the researchers were interested in the role of culverts in the distribution and genetics of the Coastal Giant Salamanders living in the Coast Range. The results indicate that culvert design will greatly influence the genetic diversity, safety and distribution of salamanders. This, in turn, has led to the redesign of forest road culverts by U.S. Forest Service (USFS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) engineers to ensure the welfare of the salamanders. Never underestimate the political power of the lowly salamander...
  • Outside Features
  • Get Off That Killer Couch! A day in the elements with Arlene Blum

    Did you know that your couch could kill you? Yes, that inviting haven ofcomfort in your living room could actually be overstuffed with carcinogens. Every day, your friendly sofa may be burping off deadly gases and cancer-causing dust may be gathering on your lovely wool carpet. Go flip over the cushions on your couch right now and look for a tag. If it says that it complies with "California Technical Bulletin 117," then you've got a killer couch. Arlene Blum has the data to prove it, but so far not enough people are listening. Arlene, a biophysical chemist at the University of California, Berkeley, is the founder of the Green Science Policy Institute. She also happens to be a pioneering mountaineer who led the first all-women teams up Denali and Annapurna in the 1970s.

Blogs

  • Off Piste
  • Riverhouse Kayak Race Returns

    A whitewater park in Bend may still be a few years out, but that isn't stopping paddling enthusiasts from celebrating their sport this month. Paddlers announced this week that they are preparing to host the second annual Riverhouse Run slalom championships on Sunday, March 28.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Race Is On for Westlund's Job

    The scramble to succeed Ben Westlund as state treasurer is on, with four candidates entered in the competition by Tuesday’s filing deadline. Bend’s Chris Telfer announced her interest almost as soon as the news of Westlund’s death broke.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Adding Up the Costs of Dropping Out

    The laws of probability allow even a blind hen to occasionally find a kernel, and the right-wing Cascade Policy Institute to occasionally produce a valuable piece of research. The institute has come out with a study titled “Oregon’s High School Dropouts: Examining the Economic and Social Costs” that lays out some startling and disturbing facts about the heavy toll the state pays because as many as one-third of its high school seniors fail to graduate.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Preparing the Way for Theocracy?

    They say a man is known by the company he keeps. If that’s true, some of the folks that state legislature candidate Jason Conger hangs with might say something troubling about him.
  • The Wandering Eye
  • Monday Short Takes

    Jeff and Marci Beagley, members of a faith-healing cult in Oregon City who let their 16-year-old son die without seeking medical care, were sentenced to 16 months in prison last Wednesday. Rejecting the defense’s plea for leniency, Clackamas County Circuit Court Judge Steven Maurer said the grisly history of the Followers of Christ Church demanded that he impose a heavy penalty.

Narrow by Type

Browse by Year

Recent Comments

Top Viewed Stories

Newsletter Signup

Cascades Reader Logo Cascades Reader

Get your daily dose of news for Central Oregon and beyond, delivered to your inbox five days a week. Powered by the Source Weekly.

© 2020 LAY IT OUT INC | 704 NW GEORGIA AVE, BEND, OREGON 97703  |   Privacy Policy

Website powered by Foundation