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  • Issue of
  • Mar 25-31, 2010
  • Vol. 14, No. 12

News

  • Local News
  • Mission Critical: A mislabeled fish species might be the best chance to restore the upper Deschutes

    For an apex predator that can grow up to 20 pounds or more, range over hundreds of miles and has been called the river wolf, the bull trout has had a tough time of it. First, there's the name. The trout-looking fish with bright orange spots and a brown torpedo-like body is really no trout at all - it's actually part of the char family. Once widespread across the Rockies and Northwest, the bull trout has been reduced to a fraction of its historic population and range, surviving in a few strongholds, like the Metolius River where the combination of clear, cold spring-fed flows and minimal human impacts allow the fish to thrive. But these types of refuges have become few and father between as human development and related impacts encroach on the few remaining corners of the West, a challenge for bull trout who are particularly sensitive to water quality and temperatures. The bull trout's need for pristine habitat has earned it the reputation of an indicator species, the proverbial canary in the coal mine, as Sierra Club conservation director and fishing guide Jeff Hickman puts it.

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • Ain't No Party Like A Tea Party: Cuddly mustaches, Freemasons and Anna Nicole's millions

    The author has been sent on the road to discover a lost country formerly known as America. He is reporting from an ER, demanding universal care for a dangerous mind and ravaged liver after uploading Or Bust's 100th episode (all in under a year) on assignment for Or-Bust.com and The Source Weekly. That Didn't Hurt At All, Did It? Now that Obama has signed health care reform (kinda, sorta) into law, let's look at how costly (the health insurance biz spent $200 million lobbying against it) and bloody it was. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO) was spat upon and called "N" (let's call it "Ninny" because the GOP and Tea Party enthusiasts aren't racist - according to themselves) yet Cleaver still declined to press charges when the racist honker was arrested by police; Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) was also called Ninny, with the Civil Rights veteran offering, "There's a lot of downright hate and anger and people are just being downright mean." GOP and Tea Party racists soon proved homophobic too, verbally assaulting Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass) as he floated up the capitol's steps, a bundle of sticks in his hand (a "faggot" by definition - which of course he was called).
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  • Editorial
  • Trashy Problem, Classy Solution

    Like the large intestine, trash receptacles are something you don't pay much attention to when they're there, but you sure miss them when they're gone. Thanks to the financial hole the City of Bend has dug itself into, downtown trash receptacles almost went away. Thanks to the Downtown Bend Business Association and Bend Garbage and Recycling, they've been saved - at least for a while. About 30 of the receptacles - those big, black steel jobs that stand on the sidewalks - were installed by the Bend Urban Renewal Agency more than a decade ago as part of a program to improve and beautify downtown. But this year the city decided it could no longer afford the $20,000-a-year expense of having them emptied.
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  • Letters to the Editor
  • Toto Needs A Place, Too

    The Old Mill Dog Park is a great addition to the city of Bend. However, it has a design flaw. Since there is no dedicated small dog play area, large and small dogs are forced to share the space, and often, their play is dangerously rough. The park is large enough to partition a safe, small dogs (30 lbs. and under) only area. As the owner of a friendly and well-behaved retired racing greyhound, I've spent upwards of an hour waiting for small dogs to clear out of the park so my dog can go in without causing alarm to small dog owners. I wait because, although my dog is not aggressive, her breed is trained to chase and hunt small prey, and I won't take the chance of her grabbing a small dog, even at play.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • America The Divided

    I have sat long enough scratching my head in dismay as I listen to very angry people scream about taking back the government. I watch a woman's face distorted in rage scream, "Go back home!" to a group of Mexican-Americans who are attempting to talk to their congressman. Politicians, rather than decry this type of communication, take advantage of this lack of civility and use it to get re-elected.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • For The Love of Mary

    Hey editor in charge and, or, chief. This new article by Mary Sojourner... this person knows how to write and write well, as in spelling. What is she doing at the back of your weekly, so full of ads that you even put a half page next to hers? You don't have many writers in your weekly that know how to write besides Bruce Miller (who also knows punctuation - yay Bruce!)

Culture

  • Picks
  • Our Picks for 3/24 - 4/1: Portland Cello Project, Cool Nutz, Cash Levy, Portland Indie Infusion, Nershi-Law Duo and more

    Portland Cello Project wednesday 24 Yeah, OK, the notion of a bunch of cellos on one stage might not sound terribly cool, but trust us, it is quite cool. This crew of cellists from their namesake town is playing a free show in which they combine their string talents Captain Planet style to give us often-rocking arrangements. They can play classically, and that's cool, but they also roll out covers of contemporary favorites, and well, that's preeety cool. Free. All ages. 7pm. McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 NW Bond St.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • In Case You Missed It: A recap of our recent restaurant reviews

    RED DRAGON One of the area's many American-style Chinese food hotspots, Red Dragon serves up enormous portions of favorites like Monoglian Beef and General Tso's chicken. Chef Casey Chan, a native of Hong Kong, prepares dishes with Szechuan, Hunan, Mongolian, Cantonese and American roots. While it's not fine dining by any means, Red Dragon is sure to please when you're craving heaping servings of steaming wok- fried goodness. 61247 S. Highway 97. (541) 389-9888.
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  • Chow
  • Little Bites: In Case You Missed It: A recap of our recent restaurant reviews

    RED DRAGON One of the area's many American-style Chinese food hotspots, Red Dragon serves up enormous portions of favorites like Monoglian Beef and General Tso's chicken. Chef Casey Chan, a native of Hong Kong, prepares dishes with Szechuan, Hunan, Mongolian, Cantonese and American roots. While it's not fine dining by any means, Red Dragon is sure to please when you're craving heaping servings of steaming wok- fried goodness. 61247 S. Highway 97. (541) 389-9888.
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  • Chow
  • Sandwich Me ASAP! Redmond's only beer café does it all

    I should have listened when my mother told me not to judge a restaurant from the sidewalk. But I didn't. Instead, I learn these lessons at my own expense. The most recent discrimination cost me countless lunches at an award-winning cafe. Readers of yours truly, The Source Weekly, voted Cross Creek Cafe "Redmond's best lunch spot" two years in a row. But based on a few passing glances at 20 miles per hour ... er ... the posted speed limit, Cross Creek Cafe looked like an ordinary deli serving, likely, the same 'ole sandwiches. Boy, was I wrong.
  • Chow
  • Sandwich Me ASAP! Redmond's only beer café does it all

    I should have listened when my mother told me not to judge a restaurant from the sidewalk. But I didn't. Instead, I learn these lessons at my own expense. The most recent discrimination cost me countless lunches at an award-winning cafe. Readers of yours truly, The Source Weekly, voted Cross Creek Cafe "Redmond's best lunch spot" two years in a row. But based on a few passing glances at 20 miles per hour ... er ... the posted speed limit, Cross Creek Cafe looked like an ordinary deli serving, likely, the same 'ole sandwiches. Boy, was I wrong.

Screen

  • Film
  • Repossess This! Harvesting organs reduces Repo Men to the sum of its bloody parts

    Sharing nothing in common with Alex Cox's 1984 punk-rock-crazy Repo Man yet more aligned with Darren Lynn Bousman's 2008 film Repo!: The Genetic Opera, this Repo Men has some wit, violence and gore, but also some problems. Like Saw VI, this film provides commentary (albeit only at surface level) on the current health care debate. Repo Men introduces us to the future with a news voiceover montage of how things came to be: global recession, fifth stage of war in Nigeria, technological breakthroughs. A corporation called The Union manufactures technologically sophisticated artificial organs, or "artiforgs" marketed and sold to gullible customers at exorbitant prices. The downside lies in the fine print that tells patients that if payments aren't made, hotshot repo men are sent to cut them open and yank out the bionic organ. Then, of course, you die.
  • Film
  • Suffer Little Children: Michael Haneke asks: "Where do little Nazis come from?" in The White Ribbon

    Funny Games director Michael Haneke's loudly lauded black-and-white drama, The White Ribbon, isn't a film to be enjoyed. It's not exactly a film to be endured, but it is closer to that end of the entertainment spectrum. Bob Dylan once said to a Time magazine reporter who asked if the audience at the concert was entertained by his performance, "Who wants to go get whipped? And if you don't want to go get whipped, then aren't you really being entertained?" In Funny Games, Haneke questioned the use of violence in films for entertainment, but here he theorizes on the origins of the violence committed by the Nazis. With Funny Games, the director was vocal about how he expected his audience to react - he wanted them to walk out once the child gets shot by the intruders. I read this in an interview after seeing the film, of which I did walk out. I didn't want to be entertained, and he didn't want to entertain me.
  • Film Events
  • Playing God: Latest God of War serves up the gore gleefully

    It's almost impossible for any God of War-type game to distinguish itself - even God of War III. The first game's formula, featuring hordes of enemies and weapons swinging in all directions, has been copied so much (and sometimes so well) that it has pushed the designers of God of War III to try a change of scale rather than style. Now, Kratos - the angry mortal hero on a mission to destroy the gods - is lost in ever-larger environments, to the point that he often becomes a dot in the landscape. In the background, the peaks of Mount Olympus and the cliffs of the Underworld glow like dioramas lit with colored Christmas lights. In these settings, Kratos resembles a plastic figurine, clinging to walls like he had been glued on and sometimes even hovering slightly above the ground as though he were being held by an invisible hand.
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  • Film Events
  • Dead People's Court

    Guys, I should TOTALLY be a judge on one of those daytime courtroom shows! You know, like Judge Judy, or Judge Joe Brown, or Judge Judgey McJudgerson? I'd be all sassy (and possibly black) and smackin' down the witnesses with snappy quips such as, "Hey! Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining pee!" Or "Don't slice off my head with an ax and tell me it's a pencil sharpener!" Or "Shut your G-D baloney-hole or I'll kick the tongue out of your yap." (Okay... that one needs work.) But instead of settling arguments in the old-timey, boring, legal way, my courtroom would have a super-cool twist - such as Judge Wm.™ Steven Humphrey's Kangaroo Court! Basically it would be like other courtroom shows, except at the end, the loser would be kicked in the face by a kangaroo. Another amazingly awesome idea would be Judge Wm.™ Steven Humphrey's Famous Court Cases Reenacted by Chimps. Is that title too vague? Basically I reenact famous court cases - with chimps. Like the Scopes Monkey Trial? Admit it... I'M BRILLIANT.
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • The Slackers' Chilled-Out Greatness

    There was a time when the Slackers album, The Question, would spend weeks at a time in the car stereo. The record is a pure recreation of authentic Caribbean ska music, not dressed up in punk accouterments, as was the case with so many other "ska" bands that were on the airwaves in the mid-1990s. Some might find what the Slackers do closer to reggae, and maybe they're right, but classifications aside, The Question is decisively my favorite album of the genre. But in the past eight years or so, I couldn't even be positive that the disc was still in my possession. That was before I heard that the Slackers were the next in a continuing line of ska bands to, somewhat oddly (but awesomely) play the Mountain's Edge Bar on the south end of town on Tuesday night. Further evidence of the Mountain's Edge's plan to become Oregon's integral ska venue (if that's possible) is the fact that just before The Slackers arrive, the Voodoo Glow Skulls play the joint on Friday night.
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  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Recordings you need to hear that you may have missed: Freakwater - Old Paint

    Freakwater Old Paint Released: 1995 Janet Beveridge Bean and Catherine Ann Irwin both have roots in punk, but when they play together as Freakwater (backed by bassist David Gay) the result is stripped-down country music with Appalachian influences and vocal harmonies that'll make you weep. Old Paint brushes through a variety of emotions that everyone of which everyone can relate. "I wasn't drinking to forget, I was drinking to remember" is the opening refrain of "Gravity," a mournful song of lost love that concludes with the solemn "all your beauty will be stolen by a young girl in the night, a thief as quiet as dark cloud that stole away the light." "Waitress Song" is a great traditional upbeat country song telling an honest story of working people.
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Toss Your Textbooks Aside: Let The Dimes be your historical audio guide

    On a recent Tuesday afternoon, Johnny Clay is eating lunch and he feels like it's about to start raining. He's on a break from his job fixing printers for Hewlett Packard in Vancouver, the gig that keeps him occupied when he's not serving as lead singer and songwriter for Portland's indie folk-pop outfit, The Dimes. Clay, a Texas native, moved to Portland from Austin to follow a girl, the age-old story. Don't worry, he assures me, he married her and they are now expecting their first child, a little girl. In December, The Dimes released their second album, The King Can Drink the Harbour Dry, which if you didn't catch from the title, alludes to the Boston Tea Party. The concept album centers on the city of Boston and it's immense role in American history. You can toss those American history textbooks aside, as this LP is an audio guide through one of the most instrumental cities in America's development.

Outside

  • Outside Features
  • Signs of Spring: Daffodils, white legs and PPP entry forms mark the season

    This weekend came in like a lamb and went out like a lion, fitting for the first weekend of spring in Central Oregon. After a gray El Nino winter, I think everyone in Bend went bonkers on Saturday when it was sunny and 71 degrees. It was hard to choose what to do that day, so most of us just tried to cram in as many outdoor activities as possible. I got in a road ride up to Wanoga without my neoprene booties and a run in shorts (exposing my winter-white legs) along the river trail. Bikers, runners and paddlers were scattered all over the place. By Sunday, a front came through, bringing fresh snow to the mountain and blowing all my over-optimistically unveiled adirondack chairs off the deck. Oh well, that's how it goes, but the signs of spring are unequivocal - the daffodils are blooming and the PPP entry forms are out.

Blogs

  • Off Piste
  • Final Four: A victory for fans outside of New Yawk

    Easily the best thing about this year's Final Four is the absence of a New Yawk team, or some other big East Coast metro college team, and all the attendant hype that they invariably get from Dickie V and all the talking head experts on ESPN who refer to the game being played as "basketbawl". Thankfully we won't hear a lot of: " Hey, I love Jimmy B and da Cuse and he'll have the big ones taking it to the rack and the small ones hoisting up trifectas," blither.
  • The Beacon
  • Free Beer!

      Okay, so maybe that’s a little misleading. But Tyler and the gang over at Silver Moon are discounting pints of Bandlands Bitter this afternoon as part of ONDA’s Badlands Bash at the pub.

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