The Source Weekly - Bend, Oregon | Issue Archives | Feb 24, 2011
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  • Issue of
  • Feb 24 - Mar 2, 2011
  • Vol. 15, No. 8

News

Opinion

  • Editorial
  • Free Straight Poop Delivered Weekly to a Location Near You

    Monday, Feb. 14 The Middle East ablaze: Iranian government uses force to quell protests ... Pluto's replacement? Two scientists at the University of Louisiana think they've found a ninth planet in our solar system that's four times bigger than Jupiter. Maybe they'll call it "Goofy" ... Bieber Fever! In an apparent act of revenge after their downy-cheeked demigod was upset by jazz bassist-singer-composer Esperanza Spalding for "Best New Artist" at the Grammies, Justin Bieber fans hack Spalding's Wikipedia page. Nasty exchanges between Bieberites and anti-Bieberites go on for 13 minutes before Wikipedia editors lock the page ... Fevered Beavers! After Oregon State University says no, students raise $4,000 on their own to pay for self-styled feminist pornographer Tristan Taormino to speak on "Claiming Your Sexual Power"... Please sir, may I have another: President Obama unveils budget that cuts programs for middle-class and poor people. Republicans (big surprise here) say it doesn't cut deep enough. Tuesday, Feb. 15 Mini-Snowpocalypse! Sneaky snowstorm dumps a foot or so of concrete-like glop on Bend; downed trees and power outages ensue ... Storm dusts higher elevations of Portland; panic ensues ... Who could have guessed: Jailed Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff, in first prison interview, says banks and investors he worked with "had to know" his activities were not exactly kosher. "But the attitude was sort of, 'If you're doing something wrong, we don't want to know'" ... Who could have guessed, cont.: Rafid Ahnmed Alwan al-Janabi, code name "Curveball," admits he made up stories about scary weapons of mass destruction that the Bush administration used to justify invading Iraq ... Another Middle East flare-up: Thousands swarm into streets of Bahrain to
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  • Editorial
  • Greg Walden's Vote Against Women

    In 1916, Margaret Sanger, founder of the organization that eventually became Planned Parenthood, opened the first center in the United States offering birth control devices and counseling. She was promptly arrested and jailed. You won't get thrown into prison for passing out condoms in the United States in 2011, but the vote in the House last week to strip Planned Parenthood of all federal funding proves that the battle of women for full reproductive freedom is a long way from being won. The vote on the amendment to cut funding was 240 to 185. Virtually every Republican - including our own Rep. Greg Walden, naturally - voted in favor. To their credit Oregon's four other members of the House, all Democrats, voted no. The vote was the climax of what has every appearance of a well-orchestrated campaign to discredit Planned Parenthood, which is the largest family planning provider in the United States and serves more than 5 million clients a year. Video from a clever sting operation staged by an anti-abortion group aimed at showing that Planned Parenthood supports child prostitution got a lot of publicity; less well-publicized was the fact that in every case, staffers reported the man posing as a "pimp" to police.
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  • Letters to the Editor
  • The Bad Lieutenant

    There's an old saying absolute power and corruption. We're not sure that's the case with former Redmond police lieutenant Larry Prince, the man charged with stealing and then selling guns from the Redmond police armory, which Prince, according to court documents, ran with little to no oversight for more than a decade.
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  • Letters to the Editor
  • Another Round of Republican Boots, Please

    <!-- @font-face { font-family: "Times New Roman"; }@font-face { font-family: "MercuryTextG3-Bold"; }@font-face { font-family: "MercuryTextG3-Roman"; }@font-face { font-family: "MercuryTextG3-Italic"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }p.LettersHead, li.LettersHead, div.LettersHead { margin: 4.5pt 0in 0.0001pt; line-height: 12pt; font-size: 11pt; font-family: MercuryTextG3-Bold; color: black; text-transform: uppercase; font-weight: bold; }p.SourceBODY, li.SourceBODY, div.SourceBODY { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align: justify; text-indent: 9pt; line-height: 12pt; font-size: 9pt; font-family: MercuryTextG3-Roman; color: black; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } --> Hey, don't stop with the BOOT to Greg Walden and his evil GOP cronies (the Koch Brothers party) for wanting to defund Planned Parenthood. They have every intention of destroying even more: PBS and the EPA, just to name two. There are a lot of petitions circulating on the Internet that need to be signed against this idiocy. Spend a little time with a two year old and see all the great programming there is for little people on PBS. Did you know that you can find every single NPR radio station programmed into your route map on MapQuest if you are on a road trip?
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  • Letters to the Editor
  • Give The Geese A Chance

    It is encouraging that so many have responded to the Bend Park District's call for volunteers in its geese program. The Park Volunteer Coordinator stated that she was "feeling really good about the quantity of volunteers who have stepped up" for this effort.
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Jobs, Not Taxes

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Culture

  • Theater
  • Theatrical Precipitation: A strong cast and direction make 2nd Street's Rainmaker a hit

    This weekend, 2nd Street Theatre owner Maralyn Thoma welcomed guests with an opening night champagne reception and red velvet cupcakes while expounding on the virtues of The Rainmaker. "It's a sweet play," she said, handing out playbills and warm smiles. "It'll make you cry." The dust bowl drama, written in 1954 by N. Richard Nash, was made famous by Burt Lancaster's riveting rendition of the play's charismatic con man who tries to swindle a small town's hopes and dreams during an epic drought. Sisters' thespian Shawn O'Hern landed the lead role of slick grifter, Bill Starbuck.
  • Theater
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: Spin Cycle bends narrative structure and delivers a solid story

    Spin Cycle, brought to Central Oregon by Innovation Theatre Works under the direction of ITW co-founder Brad Hills and starring Chris Rennolds, another co-founder, is a play that will appeal to both baby boomers and those who enjoy a modern twist on narrative storytelling. The play, with cast member Eileen DeSandre as the elderly mother of siblings Wendy (Rennolds) and Mikey, played by Derek Sitter, uses the technique of multiple asides, where each character addresses the audience, breaking the fourth wall between "us" and "them." Hills' light directorial hand enables each character the freedom to explore his or her own familial Sturm und Drang while literally staring right at us, causing the audience to empathize with the characters while doubting their narrative reliability.
  • Picks
  • Our Picks 2/23-3/3: Oscar NIght, Telluride fest and more!

    Hilst & Coffey thursday 24 Hit up this week's Sound section for the story of unlikely songwriter Tim Coffey and his excellent new CD, the release of which he's celebrating at this free show. 7pm. McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 NW Bond St. PUSH Skate Deck Auction friday 25 One of the coolest community-driven projects in Bend has been the Division Street Skatepark Project, which has been slowly working toward realizing its goal of a high-end skatepark under Highway 97 at Division Street for nearly three years now. This auction, back for another year, features custom-painted skate decks by more than 50 local and regional artists that are auctioned off to benefit the skatepark. In addition to the decks, you'll also hear some music, and enjoy drinks and snacks. 6pm Old Boomtown location, 910 NW Harriman St.

Food & Drink

  • Chow
  • A Duck Evolves: Bond Street Grill replaces Decoy

    My first impression upon entering the Bond Street Grill, formerly known as Decoy Bar and Grill, was that of a warm and delicious-smelling haven from downtown bustle. The wind was blowing and the chill was sharp.
  • Chow
  • A Duck Evolves: Bond Street Grill replaces Decoy

    My first impression upon entering the Bond Street Grill, formerly known as Decoy Bar and Grill, was that of a warm and delicious-smelling haven from downtown bustle. The wind was blowing and the chill was sharp. But the moment we stepped into the restaurant I was reminded of other cozy club-type restaurants I've enjoyed in my life, from the classic Bull and Finch Pub in Boston (the original Cheers) to dozens of other similar places in the Bay Area. The restaurant was about half full. There were several large groups chatting, drinking and eating, and everyone seemed comfortable and happy. Although the patrons were primarily of the AOL users crowd, younger people were filing in, perhaps anticipating the live blues and jazz music that the restaurant has on Saturday nights. The music is a new addition since father-and-son team Fran and Chris Nardella purchased the restaurant last year. In December, they changed the name to Bond Street Grill. Fran was a physician in Phoenix and Chris had managed restaurants, but this is the first restaurant they have owned.

Screen

  • Film Events
  • Keeping It Simple: Mario Sports takes the path of least resistance and gets results

    For years the Mario Sports games have made an art out of simplicity. Where other sports videogames try to recreate the game's action through elaborate controls, Nintendo has been taking away as many controls as possible. Instead of a gamebook full of rules and two fistfuls of buttons to handle, Mario Sports games gave me a simple goal and a single button to push. The results - a series of stripped-down takes on tennis, golf, soccer and baseball - are all-ages friendly and surprisingly challenging. So when I first saw Mario Sports Mix, I assumed it was a medley of past Mario Sports games - a four-for-one repackaging of Nintendo's classic athletic adventures. But I don't remember Mario playing dodgeball or volleyball. He has been affiliated with hockey in the past, but I've never seen the whole Mushroom Kingdom gang out on the ice. And while they've played basketball before, the tippity-tappity handheld Mario Hoops 3-on-3 is better forgotten.
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Music

  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • Dolorean: The Unfazed

    Dolorean The Unfazed Partisan Record If Dolorean has been lumped with other country folk-rock acts, that move was based on assumptions. Al James' (Dolorean's primary songwriter) lyrics and song-smithing have always elevated this group above the standard break up musings.
  • Sound Stories & Interviews
  • A Reinvention: For Tim Coffey, life as a songwriter begins at 55

    Tim Coffey has been writing music for the past two years and now is preparing to release his first full-length record. This story sounds similar to that of other local musicians, but here's where Coffey's background strays - he's 55 years old. Also, it's worth noting that he's not new to the world of music, it's just the songwriting angle that's somewhat recently become a part of his life. Coffey, you see, spent 20 years as a professional musician, touring the country with an array of bands, playing an array of styles. Most were cover bands, some were lounge bands, and some - he admits - weren't all that good. "It was all cover stuff. There were a few originals, but it was pretty standard bar music for the most part," says Coffey. By the time he was 36, Coffey had for the most part placed his musical aspirations on the backburner. He ended up moving to Holland for two years, but never really caught on with the live music scene there and returned to Oregon where he became the general manager of a pair of spas. About eight years ago, he relocated to Bend, a place that had been on his mind since he was 19 years old when he came to town with a touring band called Nancy Day and Nancy Night. "They were bad people, but I learned a lot over those six months," says Coffey of the experience."

Outside

Special Issues & Guides

  • Local Heroes
  • The Doctor: Clarence Carnahan

    It's not that Clarence Carnahan doesn't know what to do with his golden years. Carnahan plays tennis twice a week. He likes to travel and play golf. But the 83-year-old doctor still makes the trip into the Veteran's Affairs (VA) office in Bend once a week to meet with ex-soldiers, some whose service dates back to World War II, to help them deal with the lingering effects of combat. A veteran himself, Carnahan was drafted into the service during the Second World War, but gives little thought to his own service, which he describes as light duty. The men he has treated over the years as a VA psychiatrist are the heroes, Carnahan says.
  • Local Heroes
  • The Flight Nurse: Deidre Heinrich

    Deidre Heinrich wouldn't label herself a hero. In fact, when we told her she was nominated as a local hero, she spent a few minutes trying to convince us why it's her job, not her, that is heroic. But no matter what she says, Heinrich saves people's lives on a daily basis in a profession that was named the most dangerous in America by the Wall Street Journal. Heinrich, who also volunteers her time at many local charities, including the Bethlehem Inn, the Red Cross and the Bend Community Center, works 24-hour shifts as a flight nurse for St. Charles Medical Center. Each morning Heinrich heads to work, she is debriefed with her crew, which includes pilots, respiratory therapists and other flight nurses, and prepares her plane or helicopter for the unknown. Depending upon the day, Heinrich and her three-person team may respond to as many as six calls during a 24-hour period.
  • Local Heroes
  • The Veteran: Richard "Dick" Gorby

    Richard "Dick" Gorby's office in the Deschutes County Parole and Probation building is lined with pictures. A photograph of his father in military dress, a map of wartime Vietnam and photos of Gorby holding plaques, surrounded by veterans, family, friends and the parolees he works with every day. Gorby, a Vietnam veteran - he served as a minesweeper from '63 to '65 - has always been active in veterans affairs. But it wasn't until just 15 years ago when he realized he suffered from PTSD related to the war that he changed his profession from marketing to social services, leaving behind what he called his "money years."
  • Local Heroes
  • The Jack (or Jill) of all Trades: Jill Hodgson

    Jill Hodgson likes to call herself a "broke philanthropist," which is not just funny, but probably also an apt description of her role as a jack-of-all-trades do-gooder in Central Oregon. Her job finds her as the volunteer coordinator at Common Table, downtown Bend's nonprofit restaurant, but her work extends far beyond that role. She's a poet who speaks about social change, she provides a helping hand to the city's homeless youth, helps out with arts education, coordinates neighborhood food growing efforts and, on top of all that, is always looking to help out friends and neighbors who also want to get involved in bettering the community.
  • Local Heroes
  • The Rescuer: Geoff Frank

    When he's outside Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe, the popular water sports store he owns, Geoff Frank keeps a close ear on what's happening just feet from his back door on the Deschutes River. Frank and his employees are in the business of selling, renting and instructing people in the use of kayaks and canoes, but during the summer months, they've taken on an additional responsibility - listening for signs of distress near the Colorado Avenue bridge where floaters have in the past been known to find themselves in trouble.
  • Local Heroes
  • The Teacher: Robert Tadjiki

    Robert Tadjiki spends his days helping special needs students overcome disabilities by making sure that they focus on what they can do. A special education teacher at Bend High School, Tadjiki has been recognized for his outstanding work by the Oregon governor's office. In 2005, USA Today named Tadjiki to its annual teacher all-star list for his innovative approach to instruction. But it was a trip to China that truly expanded Tadjiki's horizons. There he met the director of a local orphanage who was selling traditional Chinese artwork in a public square. Tadjiki introduced himself and learned that the work was the product of Chinese orphans and that the proceeds were used to support the orphanage. The chance encounter led to the formation of a novel non-profit business, EChO (Educating Chinese Orphans) that is building schools for Chinese orphans, a la Greg Mortenson and Three Cups of Tea in Pakistan.
  • Local Heroes
  • The Soldier: Ryan James Craig

    The word "hero" is sometimes applied quite literally, which is the case with Madras native Ryan Craig. He joined the Army after doing a stint as a carpenter and was nearly killed by a sniper's bullet that pierced his combat helmet during a patrol in Kabul. Ryan, 23, was scrambling to assist a pair of injured soldiers after his unit came under fire from insurgents when he was hit. A brawny young man who played both offensive and defensive line for the Madras High School football team, Ryan literally carried the big gun in his patrol, a .308 caliber, Mach 48, designed to pin down enemy soldiers and keep them hunkered.
  • Local Heroes
  • The Trail Angel: Lloyd Gust is a Pacific Coast Trail hiker's best friend

    Lloyd Gust has never met a hiker he didn't like, and he's met a lot. Gust has been hiking the Pacific Crest Trail since 1946, or if you ask him, "back in the stone age." For the past 11 years, Gust has volunteered his time as a Pacific Crest Trail Angel, helping hikers on the trail by providing them with water while also bringing them into Bend and Sisters for medical care, a warm night's rest and plenty of beer, food and entertainment. Each year Gust helps between 200 and 250 hikers who are in need in his area of the trail, which stretches from Windigo Pass, near Crater Lake, to just south of Mt. Hood.

Blogs

  • Bent
  • How to Walk Outside Today

    This morning, I walked outside of my house and noticed that, due to Snowpocalypse 3: The Reckoning, my steps and driveway had turned into an outdoor ice skating rink. Now, this would be awesome if I was Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone, and had two bumbling burglars trying to rob my parent’s empty house. But I was just trying to get to work and I don’t have health insurance. This got me thinking about shoe choices. Below are some of my suggestions for what to wear when boots just don’t cut it:  
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  • Bent
  • New Wine Shop Downtown?

    A notice of application for a liquor license was posted downtown recently, in the building next to Joolz on Wall Street.  The business looks to be Bend D'Vine LLC.
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  • Bent
  • PUSH Skatedeck Art Auction Packs Boomtown Friday Night

    The PUSH skatedeck art show, held at the old Boomtown location on Greenwood Ave, proved a few things last night: 1. Boomtown is one of the coolest venues in Bend. 2. No matter what event you go to in Bend there will be at least sixty children. 3. There are way more great artists in Bend than I realized. 4. A bunch of people want Bend to have an awesome skatepark.
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  • Bent
  • Free Cappuccinos Tuesday at Lone Pine

    Head down to Lone Pine Coffee tomorrow to get cappuccinos on the house! In celebration of its second anniversary on Tin Pan Alley, Lone Pine Coffee Roasters is giving away free cappuccinos. The coffee house says, "It's our small way of saying, 'Thanks for seeking us out! For bringing your friends! For trusting us with your daily coffee! For making the trek down the alley no matter the weather!'" Cappuccinos will be served all day long starting at 7 a.
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  • Bent
  • And Now, For a Real Party

    On March 12, Erica Reilly, of Spork and formerly of the Grove, the Source's "Cocktailing" columnist, Columbine Quillen, are hosting a speakeasy at the Top Leaf Mate Bar in Tin Pan Alley. I heard about the previous speakeasy after the fact and besides hearing that it was great,  attendees were tight-lipped about the goings on.
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  • The Blender
  • Swampy Lake Adventure

    It has been way too long since I have been out on single track after a fresh snow. Yesterday, my sister and I decided to deviate from our normal loops around Meissner to the trails around Swampy Lake. We had some idea of where we were going from the map and times we’d been out there before, but conveniently forgot the elevation gain and loss on these trails is pretty significant. What seemed like a pretty average afternoon ski: from the parking lot to Swampy Lakes hut to Swede Ridge hut and back, turned into an exercise in almost bonking the last few miles without food or water.
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